Tag: Green Innovations

Past EMBI speaker Pregracke honored as CNN Hero for 2013

Friend of the Earth (and UW-Green Bay) Chad Pregracke has been named a CNN Top 10 Hero for 2013, earning the nod for his ceaseless efforts to clean up the Mississippi River and other American waterways. Log readers may remember Pregracke from the 2012 Environmental Management and Business Institute Green Innovations Symposium, during which he gave an inspiring address about his life’s work. Pregracke started single-handedly cleaning up the Mississippi, and has now grown his nonprofit Living Lands & Waters organization to the largest river cleanup effort in the world, with multiple barges and thousands of volunteers working side-by-side with his small paid staff. See more on Pregracke and his inspirational efforts.

More news coverage: Monitoring program featured on WFRV, Channel 5

WFRV, Channel 5 on Wednesday (May 8) carried a cool story on our own Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program. Reporter Heather Sawaski tagged along with a group of West De Pere High School students as they conducted water testing on Ashwaubenon Creek. “Our overall goal here is to just watch and monitor and try to protect our most valuable natural assets, the Fox River and the bay of Green Bay,” program coordinator Annette Pelegrin of UW-Green Bay said of the testing, which checks things such as clarity, PH levels and depth. In its 10th year, the watershed program also recently held its annual symposium on campus. We’ve linked to the Channel 5 story, as well as a photo gallery from that event (and the larger Environmental Management and Business Institute Green Innovations Symposium).

Gone green: Photos, story offer highlights of annual EMBI symposium

Keynoter David Orr, filmmaker Jeremy Seifert and alumni award winner Ryan Stockwell provided just a few of the many highlights at this year’s Green Innovations Symposium, presented by the Environmental Management and Business Institute. It was a busy three days for organizers and attendees, who explored this year’s theme of “Urban Agriculture and Community Sustainability” through a variety of discussions and events April 22-24. The annual conference also included the 10th annual Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program Student Watershed Symposium which drew nearly 100 students and teachers from area high schools, in addition to other attendees. Great photos and story.

Speaking of Earth Day… Green Innovations, EMBI’s Arendt make the news

As we told you here last week, UW-Green Bay’s Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI) today (Monday, April 22) kicks off its annual Green Innovations Symposium, a three-day event that this year focuses on urban agriculture and community sustainability. Late last week, EMBI Associate Director John Arendt spoke with WTAQ Radio about the event and its importance. “Sustainability is one prong, climate change is another, looking at our food is another,” Arendt said. “Everywhere you turn, there’s an environmental impact.”

You can check out the full WTAQ story, and link to more info from our press release, by clicking the links:
WTAQ story / UW-Green Bay press release

A Green Innovations reminder, and more on Tuesday’s watershed event

And speaking of Earth Day, here’s a friendly reminder that the Environmental Management and Business Institute will host its annual Green Innovations Symposium Monday through Wednesday, April 22-24, here on campus. We’ve linked to more general information about this year’s conference below, and we’ve also got a fresh news release on the 10th annual Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program Student Watershed Symposium (say that five times fast). Our friends with EMBI and the watershed program have put together a terrific lineup for this year’s event.

The details: Green Innovations Symposium / Fox River Watershed Monitoring Symposium
 

Remind your students: Green Innovations keynote Q&A is April 23

It may not exactly be green outside, but our friends in the Environmental Management and Business Institute are busy planning for their signature spring event, the annual Green Innovations Symposium. As we told you here before, the conference runs Monday, April 22 through Wednesday, April 24 on campus, and features a variety of terrific sessions. Among them is a special Q & A for students with noted sustainability speaker and event keynoter David Orr. This free event will take place from 3:30-5 p.m. Tuesday, April 23 in the Union’s Christie Theatre. Faculty are asked to remind their students about this great opportunity, and all are welcome to check out more details of the event by clicking the following links: UW-Green Bay news release and Green Innovations website.

Wildlife Federation’s Stockwell selected for Earth Caretaker Award

Ryan Stockwell, Class of 2001, recently was named the recipient of the University’s Earth Caretaker Award for his work on renewable energy opportunities and his promotion of using no-till farming techniques. He will accept the award Wednesday, April 24 during the Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI)’s Green Innovations Symposium at UW-Green Bay. A Social Change and Development and History grad, Stockwell earned a master’s degree in history at Miami University and a Ph.D. in history at the University of Missouri. In his current position as agriculture program manager for the National Wildlife Federation, Stockwell conducts outreach on agriculture policy and performs policy analysis on agricultural legislation impacting wildlife and natural resources. Learn more.

EMBI award winner strives to make farming sustainable for generations

Ryan Stockwell featureRyan Stockwell desires to help create a sustainable agricultural system that farmers can be proud to pass on to future generations. Stockwell, a 2001 University of Wisconsin-Green Bay graduate will be presented with the Alumni Earth Caretaker Award, at the Green Innovations Symposium, April 22-24, for his work on renewable energy opportunities and practice using no-till farming techniques.

Ryan Stockwell

Ryan Stockwell

In his current position as agriculture program manager for the National Wildlife Federation, Stockwell conducts outreach on agriculture policy and performs policy analysis on agricultural legislation impacting wildlife and natural resources. He also provides strategic leadership in eliminating barriers to farmer adoption of cover crops.

For more than five years, Stockwell has worked on environmental issues in various capacities. Prior to his current position, he was a legislative assistant in the Missouri House of Representatives working on renewable energy legislation where he said he became “immediately hooked on addressing environmental problems through policy and education.”

Stockwell was also a community organizer in Montana and other western states for the Western Organization of Resource Councils where he worked to organize landowners and residents around climate change. And he worked as a program director for the Minnesota Project, a non-profit organization educating farmers, community leaders and policy makers about renewable energy opportunities through anaerobic digesters.

An interest in environmental issues started in history class at a young age for Stockwell.

“I still recall seeing for the first time pictures of frontier folk standing proudly in front of mountains of buffalo skulls,” Stockwell said. “I felt cultural shock when thinking how absolutely different such a spectacle would be viewed today.”

Cultural ideas from formative periods in American history are what Stockwell said have long-lasting political consequences.

Stockwell, who grew up on his parents’ farm, lives in Medford, Wis., where he, his wife Stephanie, and their three sons farm using no-till and cover crop practices.

“I use no-till and cover crops for many reasons,” Stockwell said. “First and foremost is my hope to pass on farming to my three sons.”

Using practices that preserve and naturally build the productivity of the land is important to Stockwell. By combining no-till and cover crops, Stockwell said nutrient pollution to waterways is reduced.

“Meanwhile, these practices improve farm profitability, and in many cases, increase yields,” Stockwell said. “It is the classic win-win opportunity.”

Stockwell will be a guest speaker at the Environmental Management and Business Institute’s (EMBI) Green Innovations Symposium (www.uwgb.edu/embi/symposium/), April 22-24 at UW-Green Bay. The symposium features topics on urban agriculture and community stability, with noted sustainability speaker David Orr, sharing his experiences with the “Oberlin Project” and a screening of Jeremy Seifert’s new film “GMO OMG.”  It will also include a panel discussion on genetically modified organisms and a focus on the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Project.

Stockwell majored in Social Change and Development and History at UW-Green Bay before earning a master’s degree in History at Miami University and a Ph.D. in History at the University of Missouri.

— Story by Michael Duenkel, editorial intern, Marketing and University Communication

UW-Green Bay names alumnus Stockwell as Earth Caretaker Award winner

University of Wisconsin-Green Bay alumnus Ryan Stockwell recently was named the recipient of the University’s Earth Caretaker Award for his work on renewable energy opportunities and his practice of using no-till farming techniques. He will accept the award Wednesday, April 24 during the Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI)’s Green Innovations Symposium at UW-Green Bay.

Ryan Stockwell

Ryan Stockwell

Stockwell, a 2001 UW-Green Bay graduate, majored in Social Change and Development and History. He earned a master’s degree in History at Miami University and a Ph.D. in History at the University of Missouri.

In his current position as agriculture program manager for the National Wildlife Federation, Stockwell conducts outreach on agriculture policy and performs policy analysis on agricultural legislation impacting wildlife and natural resources. He also provides strategic leadership in eliminating barriers to farmer adoption of cover crops.

For more than five years, Stockwell has worked on environmental issues in various capacities. Prior to his current position, he was a legislative assistant in the Missouri House of Representatives working on renewable energy legislation; and also served as a community organizer in Montana and other western states for the Western Organization of Resource Councils, working to organize landowners and residents around combating climate change. He also was a program director for the Minnesota Project, a nonprofit organization educating farmers, community leaders and policymakers about renewable energy opportunities through anaerobic digesters.

Stockwell, his wife Stephanie and their three sons live in Medford, where they farm using no-till and cover crop practices.

Stockwell will be a guest speaker at the EMBI conference that will be held April 22-24 at UW-Green Bay. The EMBI conference will include a panel discussion on genetically modified organisms, a focus on the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Project and a conference on food and local sustainability. For more information, visit www.uwgb.edu/embi.

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