Tag: grant

Amenson-Hill was point person on Aurora Health grant vs. sexual violence

Here is clarification on Friday’s announcement that UW-Green Bay is the recipient of a sizeable grant — nearly $128,000 from the Aurora Health Care foundation — earmarked for educational initiatives related to sexual violence. The Log initially reported that Amy Henniges, director of the Counseling and Health Center, is the point person on the project. While it is true that Counseling and Health will hire and train the new campus health educator, we should have mentioned that it was Dean of Students Brenda Amenson-Hill who led UW-Green Bay’s grant application and planning process. The team included Amenson-Hill, Lidia Nonn, Mark Olkowski, Joanie Dovekas, Tom Kujawa and Henniges. The complete story, and a link to more, is archived.

UWGB shares in Aurora Health grants, gets $127,000 vs. sexual violence

There was good news Friday (July 31) regarding UW-Green Bay educational efforts on issues related to sexual violence. Aurora Health Care announced grants to two dozen community organizations in eastern Wisconsin (including UWGB) totaling $3.4 million from Aurora’s community-focused Better Together Fund. The $127,786 grant to the University will be used to develop the “Relationship and Sexual Violence Program.” Specifically, funding will allow the University to hire and train a campus health educator, create an increased online and social media presence around the topics of healthy relationships, sexual assault and bystander intervention, and expand educational programs to students, faculty and staff. Brenda Amenson-Hill, dean of students, is the point person on the project, having led UW-Green Bay’s grant application and planning process. The team included Amenson-Hill, Lidia Nonn, Mark Olkowski, Joanie Dovekas, Tom Kujawa and Amy Henniges. To read more about the Aurora grant program, and to see a full list of recipients.

In the news: Henniges talks to WBAY-TV 2 about grant 


“One of our (objectives) is to promote healthy relationships,” Amy Henniges told WBAY-TV 2 reporter Ellery McCardle about a $127,786 Aurora Health grant to UW-Green Bay. “One of the big things that our campus has never had before is a health educator, so we’re going to use a good part of that money to hire a health educator for the next couple of years to help us with our sexual assault awareness and prevention effort and increase our services to students who have been affected by sexual assault or sexual violence.” For the full story.

Cruz, UW-Green Bay team earn $10,000 grant for Latino project

A collaborative effort by UW-Green Bay faculty and staff members has resulted in a $10,000 grant award from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association. The grant will fund “Latino Americans: 500 Years of History,” a series of public events, presentations, discussions and showings of a PBS series on the Latino American experience in North America. The local event is part of a larger, national NEH and ALA initiative called The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square. The UW-Green Bay organizing committee — consisting of faculty members Marcelo Cruz (project director), Aurora Cortez and Gabriel Saxton Ruiz and staff members Paula Ganyard, Mai Lo Lee and Lidia Nonn — has proposed a series of communitywide events at various local venues. The group will work with Neville Museum, Brown County Library, Casa Alba and other community organizations to bring the series and discussion to the greater Green Bay community. Details on the showings and the events will be forthcoming for the fall semester.
 

Warner’s philanthropy class presents $10,000 to Family Services

Strategic Philanthropy course grantStudents in the UW-Green Bay Strategic Philanthropy course announced a $10,000 grant to Family Services’ Transitional Living Program in a ceremony Thursday, May 7. Students in the course taught by Associate Prof. Lora Warner of Public and Environmental Affairs are provided $10,000 by the Learning by Giving Foundation to give to a deserving organization in the community. The class focused this year on youth struggling with issues such as homelessness, alcohol and other drug addiction, and mental illness. The Transitional Living Program, a self-sufficiency program for young adults between the ages of 17-29, currently has a waiting list of over 100 individuals. Learn more.

Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.
Strategic Philanthropy course announces $10,000 grant, May 7, 2015Strategic Philanthropy course announces $10,000 grant, May 7, 2015Strategic Philanthropy course announces $10,000 grant, May 7, 2015Strategic Philanthropy course announces $10,000 grant, May 7, 2015Strategic Philanthropy course announces $10,000 grant, May 7, 2015Strategic Philanthropy course announces $10,000 grant, May 7, 2015Strategic Philanthropy course announces $10,000 grant, May 7, 2015Strategic Philanthropy course announces $10,000 grant, May 7, 2015Strategic Philanthropy course announces $10,000 grant, May 7, 2015Strategic Philanthropy course announces $10,000 grant, May 7, 2015Strategic Philanthropy course announces $10,000 grant, May 7, 2015Strategic Philanthropy course announces $10,000 grant, May 7, 2015

Healing habitats: Grant to build comprehensive plan for fish, wildlife

wolf-howe-top-storyMore than a dozen undergraduate and graduate students have a tremendous opportunity to work alongside UW-Green Bay Professors Bob Howe and Amy Wolf on a comprehensive plan to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the region.

Howe, Wolf and UWGB staff, in collaboration with The Nature Conservancy (TNC), are the recipients of a $471,000 Environmental Protection Agency/Department of Natural Resources grant to study fish and wildlife conditions and threats in what is termed the “Lower Green Bay and Fox River Area of Concern” and its immediately contributing watershed.

“This project is important for our region because it will yield one of the most, if not the most, specific plans for improving fish and wildlife habitat in the lower Bay and Fox River,” said Howe.

Howe considers the assessment, and the recommendations vital to the future regional economy and quality of life.

“Although the AOC is clearly degraded, more and more evidence has shown that this is a ‘world class’ site for freshwater fish, colonial and migratory birds, and other wildlife species,” said Howe. “I view Green Bay as comparable to Chesapeake Bay on the East Coast and San Francisco Bay on the West Coast — places where natural resources have experienced degradation, but places where these resources are still very much alive and are vital to the future local economy and quality of life,” he said.

Lower Green Bay and the Fox River below the DePere Dam comprise one of 43 Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOC’s) designated in 1987 by the International Joint Commission of Canada and the United States through the U.S.-Canada Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The ultimate goal of the UWGB/TNC project is to help develop a strategy for improving conditions in the AOC so that it can be removed or “de-listed” from its impaired status.

Loss of fish and wildlife habitat is one of the most significant reasons why the Lower Green Bay and Fox River AOC was designated as an AOC. Documented (WDNR) causes of ecological and economic impairment of the Lower Green Bay and Fox River AOC include:
• habitat destruction and fragmentation due to urban and industrial development and stream channelization;
• dredging and filling of aquatic habitats along the Fox River corridor;
• wetland degradation from human activity and changing water levels;
• disruption of hydrologic connectivity by road construction and other human activities;
• loss of submerged aquatic vegetation in the Duck Creek delta area of the lower Bay because of turbid water and hyper eutrophication;
• destruction of barrier islands in the Cat Island Chain by high water and storms;
• reduction in underwater plants and littoral vegetation by invasive carp;
• silt deposition and re-suspension of sediments in the Lower Bay; and
spread of invasive plant species.

Alongside UWGB staff members Erin Giese, Michael Stiefvater, Kimberlee McKeefry, and Bobbie Webster, Howe and Wolf are working with students on this two-year, two-phase project to comprehensively assess existing habitat conditions and formulate a protection and restoration plan in the affected areas.

In each phase, UW-Green Bay students will be able to assist the faculty and staff members and Wisconsin DNR and TNC collaborators in their comprehensive research and development of the plan.

Phase One, the assessment portion of the project, will focus primarily on finding, organizing and evaluating existing data related to fish and wildlife populations in the AOC. Information will be compiled from a wide variety of sources, including local experts, on historical conditions, habitat dynamics, restoration opportunities and threats in the lower Bay and Fox River.

Phase Two goals include synthesis of the information, creating a blueprint for protection and restoration activities; identifying specific opportunities for protection, restoration and rehabilitation of fish and wildlife habitat; cataloging past projects to assess their contribution towards delisting thresholds and developing monitoring protocols for measuring the status of fish and wildlife habitat to document the success or failure of specific remediation projects.

Proposers say the project will “test the utility of objective metrics for the ultimate purpose of informing decision-makers at local, regional and national levels, particularly those making decisions involving the status, protection and restoration of fish and wildlife habitat in other Great Lakes Areas of Concern.”

Work began in fall of 2014 and will continue through August of 2016. This project is particularly significant because it adds to a long-standing and growing involvement of UW-Green Bay scientists and students in solving problems of water quality, ecological health, and economic viability of Green Bay and the Great Lakes in general. Other recent grants by UWGB Natural and Applied Sciences professors Kevin Fermanich, Mike Zorn, Matt Dornbush, Patrick Forsythe and others, demonstrates the important role of UWGB in helping improve environmental quality in the Green Bay ecosystem.

Warner’s class presents $10,000 to Family Service transitional program

strategic-philanthropy-2
Students in the UW-Green Bay Strategic Philanthropy course announced a $10,000 grant to Family Services’ Transitional Living Program in a ceremony Thursday, May 7. Students in the course taught by Associate Prof. Lora Warner of Public and Environmental Affairs are provided $10,000 by the Learning by Giving Foundation to give to a deserving organization in the community. The class focused this year on youth struggling with issues such as homelessness, alcohol and other drug addiction, and mental illness. The Transitional Living Program, a self-sufficiency program for young adults between the ages of 17-29, currently has a waiting list of over 100 individuals. Learn more.

UW-Green Bay course to present $10,000 grant to Brown County not-for-profit

Students in the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Strategic Philanthropy course announced a $10,000 grant to Family Services’ Transitional Living Program in a ceremony Thursday, May 7.

Through this course, students are provided $10,000 by the Learning by Giving Foundation to give to a deserving organization in the community. The class focused this year on youth struggling with issues such as homelessness, alcohol and other drug addiction, and mental illness. The finalists for the grant were Family Services of Northeast Wisconsin, American Foundation for Counseling Services’ Kamp Kare, and House of Hope.

Family Services of Northeast Wisconsin provides support to people in Northeastern Wisconsin communities during challenges and transitions in their lives. These services include counseling or treatment, early childhood development, crisis services, at-risk youth programs, and self-sufficiency programs. The $10,000 grant will support the Transitional Living Program, a self-sufficiency program for young adults between the ages of 17-29, which currently has a waiting list of over 100 individuals. Brown County ranks second in the state for the number of homeless youth. This program provides an innovative approach to not only addressing homelessness but also assisting in developing a plan to address many of the other issues that come along with that.

The Strategic Philanthropy course at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is the only one of its kind in Wisconsin, allowing students to have hands-on experiences by going through the granting process themselves. This is the third year that the course has been offered and is instructed by Public and Environmental Affairs Associate Professor Lora Warner. More information can be found on the students’ blog: https://uwgbphilanthropy.wordpress.com/

#15-67

Strategic Philanthropy students will announce $10,000 recipient on May 7

UW-Green Bay students in the Strategic Philanthropy course will announce the recipient of $10,000 in grant money in a ceremony at 4 p.m. Thursday, May 7. The course, taught by Associate Prof. Lora Warner and funded by the Learning By Giving Foundation, is believed to be the only one of its kind in Wisconsin. The ceremony will take place in the Christie Theatre of the University Union. The event is free and open to the public. Students have been blogging about the course at https://uwgbphilanthropy.wordpress.com/.
 

UW System grant program targeting accessible technology has May 1 deadline

The UW System’s Learning Technology Development Council (LTDC) has received project funding to strategically address universal design and accessibility for persons with disabilities in relation to learning technology.

How might you approach a project to address accessibility of course materials, showcase your campus best practices, or create and incorporate guidelines and policies around accessible technology issues in higher education?

These funds can be used for small projects at individual campuses or partnering campuses with the goal of piloting accessibility or universal design strategies or technologies. Requests cannot exceed $5,000. Funding must be disbursed prior to June 30, 2015. Proposals are due by May 1, 2015, with applicants notified by May 15. Submit project applications or direct questions to Regina Nelson at nelsonreg@uwplatt.edu.