Tag: Graduate Studies

UW-Green Bay admits first Master of Science in Nursing students

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Professional Program in Nursing has announced that 19 registered nurses (RNs) have been accepted to the first cohort in the new online Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) Leadership and Management in Health Systems program. Living in 16 cities and six states across the country, with undergraduate degrees from four universities (most are UW-Green Bay alumni), the new admits will begin online MSN courses in Fall of 2013. The average age of those admitted is 42 years old, and the average grade point average is 3.6 (on a 4.0 scale).

The newly admitted RNs aspire to management and leadership roles and practice in diverse areas ranging from the intensive care unit to home care and public health, long-term care, surgery, cardiac care, mental health, emergency services, oncology and correctional nursing. Many already hold managerial or leadership roles such as directors, team leaders, quality measures, vice presidents of business — and even a hospital chief nursing officer.

The UW-Green Bay faculty and staff consulted with nurse managers and leaders across the nation in developing the curriculum for the MSN program. The curriculum covers 34 credits in 12 online courses delivered over two years (six consecutive academic periods). Students will participate in practicum placements during the second year at sites close to their homes.

For more information regarding the UWGB MSN Leadership and Management in Health Systems, visit the program website at www.uwgb.edu/nursing/msn/, email nursingmsn@uwgb.edu or contact Jan Malchow, (920) 465-2722 or malchowj@uwgb.edu.

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A walk in the woods: Fieldwork brings hands-on learning full circle

It was a sunny and mild morning March 3 when 18 students left UW-Green Bay to travel to Wabikon National Forest for the opportunity to track small mammals with the help of longtime UW-Green Bay Prof. Robert Howe.

This year’s field trip to Wabikon Forest Dynamic Plot was the latest excursion hosted by Howe and a team of UW-Green Bay graduate students. The plot is located approximately 85 miles northwest of UW-Green Bay near Townsend. Snowfall throughout the week preceding the field trip was helpful in creating a perfect setting for tracking the mammals that call the forest floor their home.

The Wabikon Forest Dynamic plot has been utilized by Howe and other scientists to determine which types of mammals inhabit Wabikon — and their approximate population — as well as other important fieldwork since 2007.

When the bus came to rest on the road that would take the travelers to the 6-year-old plot, it quickly became apparent that blazing trails through the crisp snow would be the primary source of annoyance for the afternoon field trip. Despite the minor inconvenience, most were in high spirits and prepared for the 30-minute hike to the plotted grid.

“Systematically recording the mammal tracks within the three columns today will increase students’ ability to recognize these animal tracks in the future,” Howe said. “We could see fisher, coyote and possibly even fox.”

Students were bundled up for the trek through the woods because in order to find the small creatures, you had to go where they lived — often under the knee-deep snow. Luckily, students only had to be on the lookout for tracks on top of the snow.

One UW-Green Bay graduate student was engaged in research of a different nature during the trip. Cindy Burtley has been researching tree growth throughout the plot. By measuring the growth or stagnation of different species of trees, Burtley and her colleagues can compare the results and allow for better forest management practices.

“By installing metal bands on the trees and measuring growth, we can tell how different species grow during different parts of the year,” Burtley said. “We didn’t anticipate how much some trees have shrunk.”

The excursion exemplifies UW-Green Bay’s 360° of Learning approach, allowing students to participate in activities that facilitate greater understanding of what it means to work in the field — with top-notch faculty — and how this work directly relates to their coursework. It’s a focus on student-centered learning from multiple perspectives that shows students what they enjoy — or may not enjoy — about their chosen career path.

“So many students don’t get to experience field work,” Burtley said. “They think because they like going out in the woods and hunting, that this is for them, and this isn’t always how it works.”

As snow crunched underneath their boots, students surveyed the ground hoping to spot tiny tracks, which were sometimes so faint that the only way to determine the species was to get on hands and knees and squint at the subtle markings. After a handful of these encounters, Howe made quick use of his logbook.

“Indistinguishable mammal,” he said.

Wabikon Forest Dynamics Plot could become a second home to some mammalogy students if their experience is a positive one. UW-Green Bay senior biology student Jesse Weinzinger noted that the trip might be the first time in a young biology student’s career in which he or she enters the field.

“Being able to search for and determine the difference between deer, weasel or other mammal tracks is just the beginning,” Weinzinger said. “This trip could open doors to enable them to develop their own research project and to better their knowledge on their way to becoming a biologist.”

After several hours of searching for small mammal tracks in knee-deep snow, the four groups gathered to rest and reflect on what each logbook now contained. Discussion was often filled with the Howe’s ideas about the different discoveries and how each year’s trip was different from the one before it.

As the bus pulled into UW-Green Bay and the 18 students departed, it was clear that each explorer had taken from the experience what it means to become a scientist. As long as Howe continues to lead this type of fieldwork, students at UW-Green Bay will continue to develop a unique brand of critical thinking.

Click images to enter slideshow.

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Photos by Marketing and University Communication interns Veronica Wierer and Holly Williams
Story by James Taylor, Marketing and University Communication intern

New Kersten text, ‘American Conversations,’ published by Prentice Hall

Historian Andrew Kersten of the UW-Green Bay faculty is co-author of new textbook being released this month, American Conversations: From the Centennial through the Millennium. It’s the second in a two-volume anthology from Prentice Hall. Kersten’s co-author is Lawrence University colleague Jerry Podair. Their U.S. history textbook features texts by famous and obscure Americans, seeking to reflect the voices of Native Americans, African Americans, women, and workers out of the backwaters onto the historical mainstream by devoting attention to these “forgotten” Americans. At the same time, the publisher’s description says, “the text acquaints students with leading figures and core texts. This juxtaposition offers a richer understanding of American history … Whatever today’s topic — race relations, the battle of the sexes, protest or piety, or unum vs. pluribus — readers will find its roots in these pages.” Each chapter has a long introduction by the co-authors introducing the primary sources. Kersten’s chapters ranged in topic from Elvis to American women in the 1950s to Samuel Huntington’s famous essay “Clash of Civilizations.” Read more.

 

Social Work master’s program listed among best in U.S.

The UW-Green Bay/UW-Oshkosh Collaborative Master of Social Work program is listed among the best in the country, according to a recent peer ranking from U.S. News & World Report. The program tied for No. 89 on the list of 200 schools listed in a subsection of the “Top Health Schools” portion of the “Best Graduate Schools” report from U.S. News. Read more about the rankings and their criteria.

Retirement party for Dr. Judy Martin

Her colleagues say Prof. Judy Martin has been an extremely valuable and productive member of the UW-Green Bay community for the past 13 years. “She is a member of the Social Work, Graduate Studies, and Women’s and Gender Studies faculties. She is a nationally recognized scholar in the field of Child Welfare, and her entire UW-Green Bay career is characterized by her consistently positive teaching evaluations and relationships with both undergraduate and graduate students.”  They’d be delighted if you would come celebrate that career with a retirement reception for Martin on Thursday, May 17, from 2:30 to 4 p.m. in Rose Hall 315.

Marinetti, Nonn, Robaidek, Sewall addresses

The Office of Graduate Studies and the Office of Grants and Research have joined the Provost staff and are now part of the combined Cofrin Library 825/835 suite.

Mail for Mike Marinetti, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Administration, should be addressed to PROVOST; his new office location is CL 825C and his phone extension is 2454.

Mail for Lidia Nonn, Director of Grants and Research (located in CL 825A, phone 2565); and Char Robaidek, University Services Associate for the Office of Grants and Research (located in CL 825, phone 2784), should be addressed to GRANTS RSRCH and it will be delivered to CL 835.

All mail for the Office of Graduate Studies should be addressed to GRAD STUDIES and will also be delivered to CL 835.  Tim Sewall, Associate Provost for Academic Affairs/Director of Graduate Studies is located in CL 835C and his phone extension is 2033.  The position of Coordinator of Graduate Student Support Services is currently vacant, but the office is located in CL 825B and the phone number is 2123 (calls and mail are being accepted).

‘Outstanding’ grad to receive graduate assistantship

There’s more to Jeff Cook, the summa cum laude triple major (Environmental Policy and Planning, Political Science, and Public Administration) than being the winner of the Alumni Association’s Outstanding Student Award for May 2011. In our news release yesterday, we could also have mentioned that Cook will receive one of the two Barbara Hauxhurst Cofrin Graduate Research Assistantships in the Environmental Science and Policy Graduate Program for the 2011-2012 academic year. The assistantship will support his thesis research on national climate-change policies and regulations.  His graduated research is being conducted with Profs. Sara Rinfret, Denise Scheberle and Scott Furlong of PEA and ES&P.

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The second student to be awarded a Hauxhurst Cofrin research assistantship is Adam von Haden, who will conduct his work with major professor Matt Dornbush.  Von Haden is also one of the first students to advance through the “integrated” program that facilitates the ability of outstanding UW-Green Bay undergrads to seamlessly complete a master’s in Environmental Science and Policy.

Deahn, honored as top football aide, is UW-Green Bay grad

FootballScoop.com has named Temple University’s Tom Deahn National Football Operations Director of the Year. Deahn, who is in fourth season at Temple, serves as liaison to university and athletic administrations, football and fan alumni groups. Deahn earned his master’s degree in administrative science at UW-Green Bay while serving as a coach and recruiting coordinator at St. Norbert College in De Pere. Read more.