Tag: French

Humanistic Studies honors top students


Last Friday (May 8), Humanistic Studies hosted an awards ceremony for outstanding students and scholarship winners.

Student honorees were:

Humanistic Studies Scholarships

Harold and Edna Bickford Endowed Scholarship – Taylor Navis

Coryll Crandall Memorial Scholarship – Danielle Eder

Thomas E. Daniels Memorial Scholarship – Samantha Molina

Lise Lotte Gammeltoft Memorial Scholarship – Faith Lent


Modern Languages Awards Academic Year 2014—2015

Academic Excellence Award in German – Ashley Thibeau

Applied Language Award in German – Sara Lueth

Academic Excellence Award in Spanish – Julia Rose Shariff 

Academic Excellence Award in Spanish – Colin Nohr 

Applied Use of Spanish Award – Courtney Mueller-Krouse 

Academic Excellence Award in French – Elijah Amelse 

Applied Use of French Award – Adam Meyer

Modern Languages program acknowledges top students

The Modern Language Award Ceremony took place Thursday and honored the following outstanding students:

French
Applied Use of French – Nicole Phillips

Academic Excellence in French – Katie Crews


German
Applied Use of German – Mitchell Harings

Academic Excellence in German – Ashley Deprey-Peeters

Spanish

Applied Use of Spanish – Julio Morales III

Applied Use of Spanish – Tanner K. Vodvarka

Academic Excellence in Spanish – Kathryn Johnson

We’re told Vodvarka gave a short speech in Spanish and English via Skype from Bucamaranga (Colombia) where he is studying this semester and, after the presentation of the awards, faculty and students enjoyed wonderful cake and refreshments compliments of the Humanistic Studies program.

Reminder on French anti-Semitism lecture

“The Jewish Question in Post-Revolutionary France: Reflections on Jews, Jewishness and Anti-Semitism (1789-present)” is the title of a free program at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday (April 29) in the University Union’s Christie Theatre. Author and researcher Gayle Zachmann, a University of Florida professor, is the guest speaker. She will discuss France’s history as the first European country to emancipate the Jews of its territory, and the contrast of the nation being plagued by anti-Semitism at various times in its history. The interdisciplinary talk is co-sponsored by le Cercle Francais student organization, the French program, and the Office of the Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences. For full details, see our previous post.

French program to host lecture on ‘The Jewish Question’ in France, 1789-present

“The Jewish Question in Post-Revolutionary France: Reflections on Jews, Jewishness and Anti-Semitism (1789-present)” is the title of a free and interdisciplinary public program at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 29) in the University Union’s Christie Theatre.

Author and researcher Gayle Zachmann, a University of Florida professor, is the guest speaker. Zachmann will discuss the apparent dichotomy of France standing alone, post-revolution, as an egalitarian force and the first European country to emancipate the Jews of its territory, yet being plagued by rampant anti-Semitism at various times throughout its history. She says anti-Jewish fervor threatened the French republic’s national narrative as a global leader in human rights as early as the 19th century, and the 20th century brought new challenges to the citizenship and survival of the country’s Jews.

More recently, Zachmann lived, wrote and researched for years in Paris and Nice as a wave of highly publicized incidents brought 21st century attention to what is known in France as “the Jewish question.” Her interdisciplinary presentation at UW-Green Bay — of possible interest to those interested in history, sociology, anthropology, diversity, French studies and more — is co-sponsored by le Cercle Francais student organization, the French program, and the Office of the Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

En hommage à Camus, Tuesday evening

Here’s a reminder that an evening devoted to celebrating the life and works of Nobel-winning author and absurdist philosopher Albert Camus, in French, is set for Tuesday, Oct. 15, in Green Bay. Visiting international scholar Luisa Etxenike will present “En hommage à Camus” at 6:30 p.m. at Kavarna Coffeehouse, 143 N. Broadway St. The event is organized by the French program and Humanistic studies academic units. Etxenike is a novelist and faculty member from the University of the Basque Country, Bilbao, Spain, who this fall is teaching courses in literature and Spanish at UW-Green Bay through the International Visiting Scholars Program. Her presentation will be made in French, with questions and answers in both French and English. The program is free and open to the general public.
 

En hommage à Camus

An evening devoted to celebrating the life and works of Nobel-winning author and absurdist philosopher Albert Camus, in French, is set for Tuesday, Oct. 15, in Green Bay. Visiting international scholar Luisa Etxenike will present “En hommage à Camus” at 6:30 p.m. at Kavarna Coffeehouse, 143 N. Broadway St. The event is organized by the French program and Humanistic studies academic units. Etxenike is a novelist and faculty member from the University of the Basque Country, Bilbao, Spain, who this fall is teaching courses in literature and Spanish at UW-Green Bay through the International Visiting Scholars Program. Her scholarship also focuses on French literature — in 2007 she was presented the Chevalier d’ Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by a ministry of the French Government. Prof. E. Nicole Meyer of UW-Green Bay’s French program says the presentation on Oct. 15 will be made in French, with questions and answers in both French and English. The program is free and open to the general public.

Say bonjour on French Day at UW-Green Bay, this Thursday

More than 200 people — French students and teachers from across Wisconsin — will be visiting campus to enjoy the annual UW-Green Bay French Day on Thursday (April 18). Prof. E. Nicole Meyer describes it as an exciting day for the University’s academic program in French and campus and community Francophiles. Be sure to say “bonjour” if you encounter any visitors — you’ll know them by their French Day t-shirts. While part of their day’s events includes a French concert just for them, the French Club has graciously arranged two evening concerts (see item below) for the rest of campus and the community.  The evening concerts will celebrate Victoria Vox’s most recent album release and, of course, feature a few French songs as well. Any questions, contact E. Nicole Meyer, meyern@uwgb.edu.

Victoria Vox, in concert
A Green Bay native with a national following and strong campus ties will present a pair of concerts on campus — at 7 p.m. both Wednesday and Thursday (April 17 and 18) — as part of French Week activities at UW-Green Bay. Victoria Vox is known for eclectic music, for being a ukulele virtuoso, and for her wonderful interpretation of French songs. Tickets are $2 for UWGB students and $5 for others at the door at the Christie Theatre. If you’d like to reserve tickets (we’re told she’s quite popular) drop an email to meyern@uwgb.edu or savanh19@uwgb.edu to inquire about availability. The shows are hosted by the Cercle Français student organization.

 

At least they had Paris: Students enjoy Packers/49ers game

Traveling abroad over the winter break, UW-Green Bay French 499 and HUS 499 students managed to catch both Packer playoff games telecast live while they were in Paris. We’re told the Vikings game kicked off at 2 a.m. Paris time, and the 49ers game started even later than that. Whether in Paris or Green Bay, the first game was a hit, the second game, not so much. But, as Prof. E. Nicole Meyer relates, “If you had to see them play poorly against the 49er’s, at least it was in one of the most beautiful places in the world, Paris.”

‘Hedgehog’ opens 2013 Green Bay Film Society series

The Green Bay Film Society’s Spring International Film Series begins 7 p.m. Wednesday (Jan. 16) at the Neville Public Museum. The first screening is the 2009 French film The Hedgehog, based on the best-selling novel The Elegance of the Hedgehog. The plot follows Paloma, a serious and highly articulate but deeply bored 11-year-old who has decided to kill herself on her 12th birthday. Fascinated by art and philosophy, she questions and documents her life, drawing trenchant and often hilarious observations about the world around her. Ultimately, she meets some kindred spirits who inspire her to question her outlook on life. Admission is free for Brown County residents. Sponsored by Humanistic Studies, Brown County Library, the Neville and the Green Bay Film Society. More information.

French Club brings back Moliere, the 17th century French satirist

Le Cercle Francais, the student French club at UW-Green Bay, is bringing back the always-popular stage show “Moliere than Thou.” The program is set for 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 22, in the Christie Theatre on the lower level of the University Union. Admission is $2 for students and $5 for community members. The famous French satirist and playwright (1622-1673) will be played in the comedic one-man show by veteran actor Tim Mooney, who has drawn great reviews for a show that is “insightful, ribald, irreverent and enthusiastic.” His performance is in English. We’ll have more, closer to the show date, but all are welcome to attend.