Tag: FOCUS

Reminder: Freshman Move-in Day volunteers

Thank you to those who have already volunteered to assist with freshmen move-in day on Sunday, August 30th from 8:30 a.m. until noon. Traditionally, faculty and staff have assisted our newest students as they move to campus. In the past, our new Phoenix families have been very appreciative and relieved to arrive on campus to find conveniently located information tables, staff directing traffic and others awaiting to help tote boxes and bags. The Office of Residence Life is asking that you be one of the volunteers who will both welcome and assist our new students with their physical move to UWGB. This small gift of your time and energy could have a huge impact on our students’ engagement and retention. If interested, please complete this short Qualtrics form by Thursday, July 30. Questions? Contact the Office of Residence Life, 465-2040 or by email, housing@uwgb.edu.

Welcome class of 2019: Parents and students prepare for fall

top-story-focusUW-Green Bay is projecting strong enrollment numbers for fall of 2015, and preparation for welcoming the newest members of the campus has begun. The recent high school graduates are on campus the next few weeks for FOCUS — First-year Opportunities for Students — to register and build connections.

Registering for classes, acquiring tools for achieving academic success, acquiring an ID card, meeting with future peers, and connecting with faculty, are all key components of the program. Current UWGB students serve as ambassadors, leading tours and information sessions. Some sessions are designed just for parents and guests.

For photos of the warm welcome by Phlash, and the rest of the UW-Green Bay community, enjoy the photo gallery.

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Photos by Eric Miller, Marketing and University Communication

Friday is the first of Admitted Student Days

Let’s join our friends in Admissions in celebrating those who have been admitted to UW-Green Bay. Beginning this Friday (Jan. 16), admitted students will be taking an important step in confirming their decision to attend UW-Green Bay by coming to campus and being met with a reception, a visit with campus faculty and staff, tours, and answers to their next questions about financial aid, housing, etc. If you see them, engage, and let them know the supportive environment they can expect at UW-Green Bay during their time here. It will likely be UW-Green Bay’s last in-person contact with students and families until after they’ve made their final decisions and, we hope, join us for FOCUS sessions in early summer. Admitted Student Days are:
• Jan. 16

• Jan. 30
• Feb. 6

• Feb. 20
• March 6

Freshman FOCUS in news as students head back to school

WLUK, Fox 11 reporter Kelly Schlicht was on hand Thursday (Aug. 28) for freshman move-in day, talking to students, parents and others about the transition from high school to college. Her story highlights UW-Green Bay’s Freshman FOCUS program, which helps students adjust to life on campus with a variety of programs that provide tools for achieving academic success and meeting new people. FOCUS co-chair and NAS Associate Prof. Steve Meyer was among those who spoke with Schlicht about some of the challenges and opportunities that can await new freshmen. “They go through this period of independence,” Meyer said, “and some of them handle it very well and others are a little less mature in the way they handle that independence.” Full story.

Move-In Day isn’t over yet… join Campus Welcome at 3:30 pm


Faculty and staff are invited to join the FOCUS team in welcoming the Class of 2018 at the Kress Event Center at 3:30 p.m. today (Thursday, Aug. 28). The Campus Welcome is the official kick off to FOCUS Orientation which runs through Saturday night. During this hour-long event, our newest students will hear from campus leadership, participate in some activities and be warmly welcomed by their new community.

For fall 2014 freshmen, school has begun

top-story-focusFOCUS R & R just wrapped up, having given most members of the fall 2014 entering class of freshmen a chance to get ready for their college careers.

R & R stands for registration and resources. The one-day programs, offered in five separate opportunities over the first two weeks of June, allowed the newcomers to do things like registering for fall classes and getting that important University ID card. They also met with faculty, staff, and returning students… and each other (through icebreaker activities, like the one above). Roughly 700 students and 1,100 parents and guests attended R & R, assisted by more than 100 faculty and staff members in various capacities.

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 FOCUS R & R, UW-Green Bay, June 2014  FOCUS R & R, UW-Green Bay, June 2014  FOCUS R & R, UW-Green Bay, June 2014  FOCUS R & R, UW-Green Bay, June 2014  FOCUS R & R, UW-Green Bay, June 2014  FOCUS R & R, UW-Green Bay, June 2014  FOCUS R & R, UW-Green Bay, June 2014  FOCUS R & R, UW-Green Bay, June 2014  FOCUS R & R, UW-Green Bay, June 2014  FOCUS R & R, UW-Green Bay, June 2014  FOCUS R & R, UW-Green Bay, June 2014  FOCUS R & R, UW-Green Bay, June 2014  FOCUS R & R, UW-Green Bay, June 2014  FOCUS R & R, UW-Green Bay, June 2014  FOCUS R & R, UW-Green Bay, June 2014  FOCUS R & R, UW-Green Bay, June 2014  FOCUS R & R, UW-Green Bay, June 2014
Photos by Eric Miller, Marketing and University Communication

Welcome, freshmen: FOCUS R & R starts Thursday

Campus will get a bit busier starting Thursday (June 5), when FOCUS Registration and Resources (R & R) kicks off its five-day run. Coordinators anticipate roughly 700 students and 1,100 parents and guests will attend R & R, assisted by more than 100 faculty and staff members in various capacities. R & R is a freshman’s first official visit to campus as a UW-Green Bay student, giving participants the chance to register for classes, meet faculty, staff and students, get questions answered, obtain a University ID and more. Advising and registration will be a bit different this year, with an advising team consisting of a staff member and several faculty members meeting with students (rather than just a single faculty member). Our R & R team tells us they’re excited about the new model because it exposes students to more faculty members and is designed to provide a more consistent advising experience for students.

More on $161,000 grant for new approaches to first-year achievement

We included a link to the news release in Friday’s LOG Extra, but for the benefit of non-subscribers and those who might have missed it, here goes:

UW-Green Bay has received a grant award of $161,504 for the “Phoenix GPS Program” from Great Lakes Higher Education Guaranty Corporation. Denise Bartell, associate professor of Human Development, wrote the proposal in her capacity as director of UW-Green Bay’s Students in Transition Center, and in collaboration with Michael Stearney, dean of enrollment services. Phoenix GPS builds on promising retention strategies used in FOCUS, first-year seminars, the TOSS program and related initiatives. The new program creates a year-long support community for a group of 125 first-year students, placing them into small groups of 25, each with a faculty mentor, a peer mentor, and an academic adviser. Over the course of the year, students will:
• Complete a first-year seminar course together
• Participate in TOSS study session
• Participate in Student Success Workshops
• Engage in co-curricular and social activities
• Consult regularly with faculty mentors and academic advisers
• Complete a service learning project together.
Attention to retention is especially important at UW-Green Bay, Bartell says, where nearly two-thirds of students are from one or more of the three historically under-represented constituencies (low-income households, students of color and/or first-generation college students). In a given year, roughly 60 percent of UW-Green Bay students are first generation, 40 percent are eligible for federal Pell Grants and 10 percent are people of color. For the full story on the new Phoenix GPS program.

About that ‘GPS’ name…
The “GPS” in Phoenix GPS is both a play on the ‘ph” in Phoenix and fitting metaphor. The initials stand for Gateways to Phirst-Year Success and, says Prof. Denise Bartell, who guided development of the proposal, “The choice of a GPS as a metaphor was quite intentional. The Phoenix GPS Program is designed to help students navigate their first year of college, anticipate the roadblocks, and chart a course to first-year success… Phoenix GPS offers these students a comprehensive array of services intentionally designed to increase student success in the first year by addressing the specific barriers to success our research indicates students at UW-Green Bay face.”

UW-Green Bay wins $161k grant for new approaches to first-year achievement

With a grant award of $161,504 for the “Phoenix GPS Program,” UW-Green Bay is one of more than two dozen institutions across Wisconsin, Minnesota and Iowa receiving support for new initiatives meant to keep students in college and on track academically, socially and financially.

Great Lakes Higher Education Guaranty Corporation is distributing a total of $4.5 million in grants this fall.  The non-profit company favors initiatives that serve students from low-income backgrounds, students of color, and those who are first in their family to attend college.

The Great Lakes grant to the Phoenix GPS Program will enable UW-Green Bay to create a year-long support community for a group of 125 first-year students, placing them into small groups of 25, each with a faculty mentor, a peer mentor, and an academic adviser. Over the course of the year, students will:

— Complete a first-year seminar course together — The first-year seminar courses are designed to offer a small-class, high-impact learning experience that involves challenging assignments, support to develop the skills necessary for academic success and an introduction to the interdisciplinary mission of the University;
— Participate in TOSS study sessions — These workshops have been found to eliminate the achievement gap in UW-Green Bay’s Introduction to Human Biology course, and the weekly, hands-on study sessions will be offered for GPS students;
—Participate in Student Success Workshops – These workshops provide students with opportunities to develop skills essential to academic success including time management, to polish relevant life skills such as financial management, to begin work on academic-major exploration and career planning, and to learn about the resources and services the University provides to support student success;
— Engage in co-curricular and social activities — GPS students will meet regularly with program staff and other students, including monthly dinners;
— Consult regularly with faculty mentors and academic advisers — GPS students will meet regularly with faculty mentors and academic advisers in order to identify and address any problems early, receiving individualized support if necessary; and
— Complete a service learning project together.

The activities aim to improve retention and persistence by helping students develop academic success skills, become familiar with campus resources, develop helpful relationships with mentors and peers, and connect to the campus community through co-curricular and service involvement.

The “GPS” in Phoenix GPS Program is an acronym for Gateways to Phirst-Year Success.

“The choice of a GPS as a metaphor was quite intentional,” says Denise Bartell, an associate professor of Human Development and Psychology who guided development of the proposal. “The Phoenix GPS Program is designed to help students navigate their first year of college, anticipate the roadblocks, and chart a course to first-year success.”

Bartell is director for the Students in Transition Center at UW-Green Bay, and has been active in promoting programs and teaching practices that are intended to improve graduation rates and year-to-year retention. Bartell wrote the Great Lakes grant proposal in collaboration with Michael Stearney, the University’s dean of enrollment services.

Attention to retention is especially important at UW-Green Bay, Bartell says, where nearly two-thirds of students are from one or more of the three historically under-represented constituencies. In a given year, roughly 60 percent of UW-Green Bay students are first generation, 40 percent are eligible for federal Pell Grants and 10 percent are people of color.

“Since these students often have a more difficult transition to college, they are statistically more likely to leave before completing their degree,” Bartell says. “The Phoenix GPS Program offers these students a comprehensive array of services intentionally designed to increase student success in the first year by addressing the specific barriers to success our research indicates students at UW-Green Bay face.”

“Success for a first-year student certainly includes getting good grades in their first semester,” Stearney says. “But success is also about building deep and supportive relationships with fellow students, faculty and staff, developing the skills and habits of a successful college student, growing in self-confidence, and getting connected with the Green Bay campus and community.”

The Great Lakes grant also supports more academic support to first-year students in the form of additional assistance from staff members in the University’s Academic Advising office, student tutors and peer mentors.

Bartell says total funding for the project is more than $260,000, which includes a match of approximately $100,000 by the University to the Great Lakes grant. She says more than 20 faculty and academic staff members and students from across campus will be involved in implementing the program.

“It’s very important to all of us at UW-Green Bay that all students who enroll at our University are given every chance to succeed,” Bartell says. “The funding from the Great Lakes Higher Education Guaranty Corporation allows us to develop a sustainable program to ensure that historically under-represented students succeed and thrive in college.”

“The programs being funded by this round of College Success grants are providing services proven to help students make progress toward their degree,” said Richard D. George, Great Lakes’ president and chief executive officer. “Each program has been thoughtfully designed to address the challenges known to keep students from graduating, helping them to develop connections to their campus, peers, faculty and staff and overcome financial obstacles. We look forward to seeing the impact of each of these programs in helping their students persist toward graduation.”

Along with UW-Green Bay, Wisconsin institutions receiving Great Lakes College Success grants are Alverno College, Cardinal Stritch University, Milwaukee Area Technical College, Mount Mary University, Marquette University and UW-Milwaukee in Milwaukee, College Possible of Milwaukee, Madison College, St. Norbert College in De Pere, UW-Eau Calire, UW College-Marathon County, UW-Oshkosh and UW-Parkside.

To see the Great Lakes Higher Education Guaranty Corporation news release and details on all of the projects, visit the webpage here.

Bash in the Stacks is Thursday

The Cofrin Library’s annual welcome back party for students takes place Thursday (Sept. 12) from 7 to 11 p.m. It’s a rodeo theme and a rootin’ tootin’ good time is promised. They’ll have Nerf Tag, an obstacle course, line dancing, and an old time photo booth! Test your knowledge at the trivia contest to win tickets to the General Store. Bash in the Stacks is sponsored by FOCUS, Student Life, and Cofrin Library. More details.