Tag: EMBI

‘Eco U’ makes Green Colleges Guide for fourth straight year

UW-Green Bay is one of the 353 most environmentally responsible colleges in the U.S. and Canada as recognized by Princeton Review.

The education services company profiles UW-Green Bay in the 2015 edition of its free downloadable book, “The Princeton Review’s Guide to 353 Green Colleges.”

The Princeton Review chose the schools for this guide based on a survey it conducted in 2014 of administrators at hundreds of four-year colleges to measure the schools’ commitment to the environment and to sustainability. The institutional survey included questions on the schools’ course offerings, campus infrastructure, activities and career preparation.

Published April 16, a few days before the April 22 celebration of Earth Day, the 218-page guide can be downloaded at www.princetonreview.com/green-guide and www.centerforgreenschools.org/greenguide.

The school profiles in the guide feature essential information for applicants — facts and stats on school demographics, admission and financial aid — plus write-ups on the schools’ sustainability initiatives. A “Green Facts” sidebar reports on a wide range of topics from the school’s use of renewable energy sources, recycling and conservation programs to the availability of environmental studies and career guidance for green jobs.

In the guide’s profile, The Princeton Review says “Eco U has historically strong academic programs in environmental science and environmental policy and planning at both bachelor’s and master’s levels,” mentions various UW-Green Bay courses and research opportunities, along with “green” building design feature and the University’s Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI).

UW-Green Bay is one of five of the UW System’s 13 four-year campuses to be included in the 2015 edition. The others are Eau Claire, Milwaukee, Oshkosh and Stevens Point.

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Kriebel receives sixth annual Earth Caretaker Award

caretaker-top-storyThe University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI) and the Alumni Association jointly awarded the 2015 Earth Caretaker Award to 1977 UW-Green Bay graduate David Kriebel on Monday, March 23. He was the sixth recipient of the award for his work on sustainability.

Professor Kriebel has been on the faculty of the Department of Work Environment at the University of Massachusetts Lowell since 1988, where he teaches introductory and advanced courses in epidemiology, risk assessment, and research synthesis.

As a researcher, Kriebel focuses on the epidemiology of occupational injuries, cancer, and non-malignant respiratory disease. He has served on several National Academy of Sciences committees on environmental health, along with writing and lecturing on the role of epidemiologic evidence in science policy decision making.

He also serves as the Director of the Lowell Center for Sustainable Production, which collaborates with industries, government agencies, unions, and community organizations on the redesign of systems of production to make them healthier and more environmentally sound.

Kriebel graduated summa cum laude from UW-Green Bay in 1977 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Biology. He completed a master’s degree in physiology and occupational health in 1983 and a doctorate in epidemiology in 1986 at the Harvard School of Public Health. Kriebel worked for famous environmentalist and author, Barry Commoner, for several years at Washington University in St. Louis.

Kriebel said he left his hometown of Philadelphia to study at UW-Green Bay because he was a “high school eco-freak, and determined to devote his life to improving the planet and reducing human suffering.” As a student, Kriebel was highly involved in the environmental movement helping to organize the Union of Young Environmentalists, a national student organization, as well as lobbying the state legislature for a special designation for UW-Green Bay as having an environmental mission.

Kriebel returned to UWGB to deliver the 2008 commencement address, in which he told graduates that “No matter what your career path, act as if you live on a small and very finite planet — think of her as you walk through life, choosing in 10,000 small ways the mark you will make and the legacy you will leave your children and their children.”

In the photo above, he is congratulated by, from left to right, City of Green Bay Mayor Jim Schmitt, UWGB Prof. John Katers, and Chancellor Gary Miller. The Earth Caretaker Award honors UW-Green Bay graduates who have distinguished themselves in their professional field and are widely recognized for their career accomplishments in the areas of sustainability, environmental management, environmental policy, or other closely related areas.

(Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.)
 2015 Earth Caretaker Award ceremony and reception, University Union, March 23, 2015    2015 Earth Caretaker Award ceremony and reception, University Union, March 23, 2015    2015 Earth Caretaker Award ceremony and reception, University Union, March 23, 2015    2015 Earth Caretaker Award ceremony and reception, University Union, March 23, 2015    2015 Earth Caretaker Award ceremony and reception, University Union, March 23, 2015    2015 Earth Caretaker Award ceremony and reception, University Union, March 23, 2015    2015 Earth Caretaker Award ceremony and reception, University Union, March 23, 2015    2015 Earth Caretaker Award ceremony and reception, University Union, March 23, 2015

– Story by Katelyn Staaben, editorial intern, Marketing and University Communications

Photos by Mike Arendt

Kriebel to receive sixth annual Earth Caretaker Award

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI) and the Alumni Association will jointly award the 2015 Earth Caretaker Award to 1977 UW-Green Bay graduate David Kriebel.

The award ceremony and reception will be held Monday, March 23, 2015 from 5:30 to 8 p.m. in the Phoenix Room of UWGB’s University Union.

Kriebel has been on the faculty of the Department of Work Environment at the University of Massachusetts Lowell since 1988, where he teaches introductory and advanced courses in epidemiology, risk assessment, and research synthesis.

As a researcher, Kriebel focuses on the epidemiology of occupational injuries, cancer, and non-malignant respiratory disease. He has served on several National Academy of Sciences committees on environmental health, along with writing and lecturing on the role of epidemiologic evidence in science policy decision making.

He also serves as the Director of the Lowell Center for Sustainable Production, which collaborates with industries, government agencies, unions, and community organizations on the redesign of systems of production to make them healthier and more environmentally sound.

Kriebel graduated summa cum laude from UW-Green Bay in 1977 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Biology. He completed a master’s degree in physiology and occupational health in 1983 and a doctorate in epidemiology in 1986 at the Harvard School of Public Health. Kriebel worked for famous environmentalist and author, Barry Commoner, for several years at Washington University in St. Louis.

Kriebel said he left his hometown of Philadelphia to study at UW-Green Bay because he was a “high school eco-freak, and determined to devote his life to improving the planet and reducing human suffering.” As a student, Kriebel was highly involved in the environmental movement helping to organize the Union of Young Environmentalists, a national student organization, as well as lobbying the state legislature for a special designation for UW-Green Bay as having an environmental mission.

Kriebel returned to UWGB to deliver the 2008 commencement address, in which he told graduates that “No matter what your career path, act as if you live on a small and very finite planet — think of her as you walk through life, choosing in 10,000 small ways the mark you will make and the legacy you will leave your children and their children.”

The Earth Caretaker Award honors UW-Green Bay graduates who have distinguished themselves in their professional field and are widely recognized for their career accomplishments in the areas of sustainability, environmental management, environmental policy, or other closely related areas.

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That’s a wrap: Students keep ton of plastic bags out of waste stream

top-plastic-film-recycleIt hasn’t even been on campus for a year, but the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay plastic film recycling program has already processed the equivalent of nearly one million plastic bags.

“We’ve recycled somewhere between 1800 and 2200 pounds of plastic film,” said former student intern Matthew Malcore. “Not all of it has been just plastic bags, but assuming the weight of a plastic bag is 5.5 grams, this equals the weight of between 816,000 and 997,900 plastic bags. Approaching the weight of one million plastic bags in under a year, just at a community level. That is pretty amazing to me,” Malcore said.

The goal of the plastic film recycling program is to keep plastic films, such as grocery bags and pallet wrap, from the waste stream. When not collected separately, the films can pose problems. If thrown into the garbage can, the plastic film would end up in a landfill, but attempting to recycle it along with plastic or glass containers and paper, could clog the sorting machines at the recycling facility, which are typically designed to handle rigid materials.

“Aware of this problem, we were searching for a better solution,” said Felix Pohl, sustainability communications manager. “If we collect plastic films separately, they do not pose a problem in the waste stream and furthermore the material can be re-purposed by specialized recycling companies.”

In order to accomplish this, an Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI) intern took on the job.

“One of our former interns in the EMBI internship program had made contact with Zeus Recycling from Sheboygan regarding plastic film recycling and wondered if EMBI could assist in providing intern support to Zeus in order to launch a pilot program on plastic film recycling here on campus,” said John Arendt, EMBI Associate Director. “Utilizing the Great Lakes Internship Initiative grant, EMBI offered student Matthew Malcore to provide Zeus with that help to begin the plastic film pilot.”

The program officially began on March 1, 2014, when 12 drop-off boxes, provided by Green Bay Packaging, were placed in various locations around campus, including 10 in public areas and two in maintenance areas.

“As we essentially started the program without any particular funding, we utilized donated cardboard containers and mounted self-made signs on them,” said Pohl.

story-plastic-filmAs the student intern, Malcore (pictured at left) was in charge of collecting the plastic film at each of the collection points, sorting, and baling the material. Beginning halfway through the fall 2014 semester, Malcore has been helping to transfer the management of the program to the Public and Environmental Affairs Council (PEAC).

“A significant part of our outreach was to involve the students from PEAC, a great student organization bringing together students from all over campus who share a genuine concern for how we build our future in the face of environmental challenges,” said Pohl.

Malcore, a member of PEAC, will be helping the organization to continue the program.

“As PEAC is now the group responsible for the program, I will be continuously training members on how to collect, differentiate and bale the plastic,” said Malcore.

The program was implemented October of 2014, starting with bins placed in the laundry rooms of residence halls.

“Some bins were packed full after the first week and others took a bit longer to fill,” said Kayla Billet, Residence Life Eco-intern and Co-leader of the Residence Green Life Committee, “The committee members then bring the collected plastic film to the larger collection box in the Community Center. From there the organization PEAC does the collecting and packaging for further recycling.”

The program’s popularity has spread past the boundaries of campus as well.

“Currently, the popularity of plastic film is growing throughout the state, said Arendt, “We have seen other campuses start programs, but UW-Green Bay was the first. K-12 schools are taking on recycling, and the Wisconsin DNR is promoting the program.”

Plastic film recycling programs are a step in the right direction, but according to Malcore, eliminating all use of these plastics is the best solution.

“Single-use plastics have become a growing problem, especially as pollutants of the oceans,” said Malcore, “Using cloth bags instead of plastic bags and re-using water bottles instead of purchasing new ones constantly is always preferable to using single-use plastics. Even though more of the single-use plastics, such as plastic bags, increases the amount of material we reclaim and technically makes the program more profitable, PEAC is an environmental organization and the purpose of both the organization and the program is to reduce environmental impact.”

In the coming months, the program will start diverting the plastic film to TREX Decking in order for the film to find new life in the form of park benches and decks.

“This program provides the opportunity for students, faculty, and staff to first think about plastic film not as waste but as a resource and to actively divert it from the landfill,” said Arendt, “This is education in action.”
Story by Katelyn Staaben, editorial intern, Marketing and University Communication

‘Well-connected’ Weyenberg tapped as inaugural Cofrin Executive-in-Residence

top-story-WeyenbergA respected business and community leader has become the first-ever Executive-in-Residence for UW-Green Bay’s Austin E. Cofrin School of Business.

Tim Weyenberg, past CEO and current Executive Chair of the Board of Directors for Foth Companies, is in the early stages of his tenure in the newly created role. He is working with University stakeholders to determine how he can be most effective, and will have a more consistent presence on campus — including regular office hours and more — come spring.

Even in its formative stages, Weyenberg’s role — and his leadership — promises to make a difference, said Cofrin School of Business Director Lucy Arendt.

“Tim is especially well-connected, knowledgeable, super energetic,” Arendt said. “He’s got a great reputation in the community as a leader, and also in terms of his connections to the campus. He’s very committed — genuinely interested in strengthening the relationships between the campus and community. So he’s a perfect choice for this.”

Weyenberg spent 28 years with Foth, 16 as CEO, before retiring in March 2013. His extensive community involvement has included leadership roles with the New North, Greater Green Bay Community Foundation and Green Bay Area Chamber of Commerce. He received the 2013 Free Enterprise Award from the Rotary Club of Green Bay. At UW-Green Bay, he has been actively involved with the Business program, the Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI), Phuture Phoenix program and more. This next opportunity, Weyenberg said, is an exciting one.

“When she (Arendt) explained what they were trying to accomplish, with enhancing the connection between the school of business and the business community,” Weyenberg said, “it seemed to me this role provided a huge opportunity to enhance that Cofrin School of Business vision of being knowledge-seekers in Northeastern Wisconsin.

“I think we know there’s a lot going on — but there’s also a lot to do.”

With new UW-Green Bay Chancellor Gary L. Miller stressing attention to innovation, entrepreneurship and partnerships, that work is likely to have high priority. Immediate tasks include establishing a Cofrin School of Business advisory board, a process with which Weyenberg will be deeply involved. He also will advise faculty on curriculum, work one-on-one with students, guest lecture and help with things such as mock interviews. And while Weyenberg definitely has ideas of what his executive residency may look like, he’s reaching out to students, faculty and others to help him further define the role.

“There’s really two themes I have in mind at this point,” Weyenberg said. “One is improving the connectivity between the Cofrin School of Business, between the University and the business community… Another one is relevance … how do we engage that community to make what is being produced by the school of business even more relevant to the potential customer, the employer?”

Made possible with funds from the University’s largest-ever academic gift — $5.5 million from Dr. David A. Cofrin — Weyenberg’s tenure will last one to two years. And while his business acumen is second to none, Arendt said, Weyenberg also will show students how to be a well-rounded and contributing member of a community — a message, she says, that is critical.

“He’s not just somebody who has done well at work,” Arendt says. “Students sometimes, they get a lot of questions about what they’re going to be doing to make a living, and that sort of thing.

“It’s not about what are you doing to make a living, but what are you doing to make a life? And I think he’s a great role model for that.”

For more information on the appointment of Weyenberg as Executive-in-Residence for the Cofrin School of Business.

Aurora BayCare commits $107,000 to renew EMBI grant

The Environmental Management and Business Institute at UW-Green Bay has received $107,000 in grant funding from Aurora BayCare Medical Center to continue a multi-year community partnership through 2017. The arrangement, which began in 2010, provides opportunities for EMBI interns to work directly with the healthcare provider to assess and evaluate environmental performance through benchmarking. The students help to identify potential areas for improvement in water reduction, energy efficiency, solid waste management, waste minimization and pollution prevention. Interns work under the direction of an EMBI faculty member and staff from the healthcare provider. To date, eight students have benefited from the real-world experience provided by the grant.
 

EMBI, grad student get $7,000 for Tosca study of shipping containers

The Environmental Management and Business Institute was recently awarded project funding from Tosca Ltd. to complete a life-cycle analysis of shipping containers used by the Green Bay company. Environmental Science and Policy grad student William Lobner will be supervised by EMBI associate director, John Arendt, in taking a closer look at the reusable plastic containers and corrugated containers used in Tosca’s poultry transportation sector. While not a large grant in terms of the University’s overall annual total, the $7,000 in corporate funding is seen as another positive indicator and natural outgrowth of the larger Career-Ready Internship Initiative started last year.

UW-Green Bay receives $150K grant to boost internship opportunities

UW-Green Bay’s Center for Public Affairs (CFPA) and Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI) recently received their second $150,000 Career Ready Internship Initiative grant from HYPERLINK “http://www.mygreatlakes.org/community” Great Lakes Higher Education Guaranty Corporation. This grant will benefit students by offering them opportunities to gain invaluable, real-world experience through paid internships in their fields of study.

UW-Green Bay will use the grant to create new paid internships and turn previously unpaid internships into paid internships, for juniors and seniors who don’t receive enough financial aid to cover college costs.

“With the Career Ready Internship Initiative grant, UW-Green Bay can enable students to achieve educational and professional goals while meeting personal and family obligations,” said Ashley Heath, associate director of the Center for Public Affairs.

UW-Green Bay, part of last year’s internship grant pilot, is one of 40 Wisconsin colleges and universities to receive some of the more than $5.2 million in Career Ready Internship Initiative grant funds awarded by Great Lakes. Schools will collaborate with businesses and nonprofit organizations across the state to create the new paid internships.

“This opportunity benefits our students, organizations in the region, and the UW-Green Bay campus,” said John Arendt, EMBI associate director. “It’s a win-win for everyone.”

Interested businesses and organizations in Northeastern Wisconsin should contact Ashley Heath, (920) 465-2608, or John Arendt, (920) 465-2953, for more information.

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EMBI summer intern helps Port Washington launch sustainability push

UW-Green Bay student Hanne Guthrie was instrumental in operationalizing and rolling out a new Green Business Program for the city of Port Washington, Wis. Guthrie’s summer internship with the city was arranged through EMBI (the Environmental Management and Business Institute), headquartered at UW-Green Bay. The program recognizes businesses employing green and sustainable practices. The success of the first participant, the Java Dock Café, has spurred other local businesses to accept the challenge of being recognized as good environmental and community stewards. See a post on EMBI’s website.