Tag: Eco U

Use an E-form, save a tree 

The paperless office? Even good ol’ Eco U isn’t there yet, but a friend and loyal Log reader who works in information systems on campus shares the following: UWGB has reached an interesting milestone with the Dynamic Forms (E-forms) initiative on campus. In 2014, the Registrar’s Office alone processed 8,902 electronic forms. With estimates that one tree equals approximately 8300 sheets of paper… “We saved a whole tree last year!” Good work!

Students plan Earth Week at UW-Green Bay

Student organizations at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay have taken the lead in scheduling a full lineup of Earth Week events Monday through Saturday, April 20-25. Wednesday is the 45th anniversary of the first Earth Day, which took place on April 22, 1970.

Events, times, places and sponsors for the 2015 observances are as follows:

Monday, April 20

•  Showing of documentary ‘Making Stuff Wilder’ about modeling future technology after nature’s designs, 8 p.m., Christie Theatre of the University Union, presented by student Chemistry Club

Tuesday, April 21

•  Cleanup Walk I — The first of two similar walks this week, this one runs from 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. with participants fanning out from the Cofrin Library, outdoors near the “Sifting and Winnowing” replica plaque. Organized by the American Environmental History course.

•  Earth Week Forum, from 3 to 7 p.m. in the Union’s Phoenix Room C, with booths and displays by campus and community organizations starting at 3; remarks by NEW Water resource specialist Erin Wilcox at 4; a locally sourced meal courtesy of Trust Local Foods at 5; and remarks by business leader and environmental advocate Robert Atwell, president and CEO of Nicolet Bank, Green Bay, at 6 p.m. The forum is sponsored by the Student Government Association’s environmental committee.

Wednesday, April 22, Earth Day

•  Earth Week Picnic, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the University Union plaza atop the Student Services Building — with a no-cost lunch for UWGB students ($5 for community members), live musical performances by the UW-Green Bay Hand Drumming Ensemble and the Milwaukee indie-folk-country band Ladders, and activities and giveaways related to water and native plant species. (Rain location is inside the Union.) Sponsored by the student Public and Environmental Affairs Council, the Dietetics Club and the SLO Food Alliance.

•  Lecture on Native Plants, at 6 p.m. in Room 219 of Mary Ann Cofrin Hall, with speaker Justin Kroening from Stone Silo Prairie Gardens talking about the benefits of native plants and value for wildlife, organized by Round River Alliance.

Thursday, April 23

• Planting at the University Garden, beginning at 5:30 p.m., in the planters at the University Union plaza atop the Student Services Building. Volunteers welcome. Hosted by the SLO Food Alliance.

Friday, April 24

•  A second day of planting at the University Garden, beginning at 5:30 p.m., in the planters at the University Union plaza atop the Student Services Building. Volunteers welcome. Hosted by the SLO Food Alliance.

Saturday, April 25

Annual Arboretum Cleanup, from 9 a.m. to noon — Participants are asked to meet at the corner of Champeau and Sussex roads and to bring rainboots and gloves. Organized by the Round River Alliance.

Questions about any of the events can be directed to student Anna Gribova, an officer of the PEAC organization, at sopeac@uwgb.edu.

‘Eco U’ makes Green Colleges Guide for fourth straight year

UW-Green Bay is one of the 353 most environmentally responsible colleges in the U.S. and Canada as recognized by Princeton Review.

The education services company profiles UW-Green Bay in the 2015 edition of its free downloadable book, “The Princeton Review’s Guide to 353 Green Colleges.”

The Princeton Review chose the schools for this guide based on a survey it conducted in 2014 of administrators at hundreds of four-year colleges to measure the schools’ commitment to the environment and to sustainability. The institutional survey included questions on the schools’ course offerings, campus infrastructure, activities and career preparation.

Published April 16, a few days before the April 22 celebration of Earth Day, the 218-page guide can be downloaded at www.princetonreview.com/green-guide and www.centerforgreenschools.org/greenguide.

The school profiles in the guide feature essential information for applicants — facts and stats on school demographics, admission and financial aid — plus write-ups on the schools’ sustainability initiatives. A “Green Facts” sidebar reports on a wide range of topics from the school’s use of renewable energy sources, recycling and conservation programs to the availability of environmental studies and career guidance for green jobs.

In the guide’s profile, The Princeton Review says “Eco U has historically strong academic programs in environmental science and environmental policy and planning at both bachelor’s and master’s levels,” mentions various UW-Green Bay courses and research opportunities, along with “green” building design feature and the University’s Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI).

UW-Green Bay is one of five of the UW System’s 13 four-year campuses to be included in the 2015 edition. The others are Eau Claire, Milwaukee, Oshkosh and Stevens Point.

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Eco U’s integrated curriculum made big impression on Northwoods naturalist

top-story-naturalistUW-Green Bay’s integration of higher education and the environment has imprinted a lasting impression on alumnus John Bates ’74 of Communication Action.

Bates used lessons learned at Eco U to forge a successful career as a Wisconsin naturalist, writer, blogger, professor and nature guide in the Northwoods of Wisconsin. Bates looks back on his days at UW-Green Bay as a dynamic time to be on campus.

“I attended UW-Green Bay at a time of great energy and excitement. It was a time of converting cornfields into a vision of what an environmental campus should look like,” says Bates.

His writings include several books on nature in the upper Midwest and Great Lakes Region. He uses observations of the seasons, plants, animals, phenology and ecology as inspiration for his work. Bates was initially attracted to UW-Green Bay by the ecologically oriented curriculum and the school’s commitment to the environmental sciences.

“I relished the many field trips – all the hands-on, get your feet wet learning that we were exposed to. Those perhaps were my best memories at UW-Green Bay,” Bates recalls.

He credits the faculty at UW-Green Bay with sparking his interest in environmentalism and steering him toward a rewarding career as a naturalist and author. Bates reminisces about his favorite classes at UW-Green Bay.

“I took every class I could from Dr. Keith White, and sat in on several classes for a second time just to hear it all again. His introductory Vegetation of Wisconsin class launched a lot of young students into the ecology field. I also really enjoyed and benefitted from Dr. Paul Sager’s freshwater invertebrates class, Dr. John Reed’s botany class (co-taught by Gary Fewless), and Dr. Richard Presnell’s many environmental education classes. They were all superb professors and made a lasting impression on me,” Bates says.

He returned to UW-Green Bay and received his Master’s Degree in Environmental Science in 1986. Bates and his wife, artist and fellow UW-Green Bay alum, Mary Burns ’85 of English and Natural History, live on the Manitowish River in Iron County where they own and operate the Manitowish River Press, a publishing company devoted to producing books that celebrate the natural world. Bates is currently working on his eighth book, Old Growth Forests of Wisconsin. The work Bates is most proud of is “A Northwoods Almanac,” a regular column for the local newspaper in Minocqua. This is his 25th year writing it, and he feels it seems to have mattered to a lot of folks.

“I post their sightings, discuss what’s going on currently in the natural world — the flowerings, nestings, migrations, and try to truly celebrate the beauty of this place we call the Northwoods. Hopefully I’ve helped some people fall more deeply in love with, and understand more thoroughly, their home,” Bates says.

The bee’s knees: Campus keepers reap sweet rewards with harvest

UW-Green Bay student beekeepersA contingent of UW-Green Bay student beekeepers got to taste the fruits of their labor July 29, harvesting honey from two new hives located near the campus Heating and Cooling Plant Building.

The project is up and running thanks to a new student organization, the GBees, with the hives and their tenants arriving on campus this spring. The student-funded club aims to promote the environmental, biodiversity and local food aspects of beekeeping while drawing attention to the negative implications of declining honeybee numbers across the globe.

The students have gotten a hand in their endeavors from Bill Ahnen, a UW-Green Bay electrician who’s been a beekeeper for about seven years. On July 29, Ahnen took them through the harvest process, which involves removing the honeycomb, scraping off the wax covering on one side of the frame and placing it in an extractor. This centrifuge spins the honey out of the comb before the other side is scraped and extracted. The empty combs are then returned to the hive for the bees to refill.

Led by Ahnen, the student group extracted honey from 20 frames during the harvest, collecting approximately 50 pounds of honey. The beekeepers eventually hope to be able to sell their honey, perhaps alongside the University’s SLO Food Alliance during its summer vegetable sales. For now, it’s providing some industrious students a very sweet reward for their time.

— Photos by Eric Miller, Office of Marketing and University Communication

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‘Eco U’ once again listed in Princeton Review’s Guide to Green Colleges

UW-Green Bay is one of the 332 most environmentally responsible colleges in the U.S. and Canada, according to The Princeton Review.

The education services company profiles UW-Green Bay in the fifth annual edition of its free downloadable book, “The Princeton Review’s Guide to 332 Green Colleges.”

The Princeton Review chose the schools for this guide based on a survey it conducted in 2013 of administrators at hundreds of four-year colleges to measure the schools’ commitment to the environment and to sustainability. The institutional survey included questions on the schools’ course offerings, campus infrastructure, activities and career preparation.

Published April 17, a few days before the April 22 celebration of Earth Day, the 216-page guide is the only free comprehensive resource of its kind: it can be downloaded at www.princetonreview.com/green-guide and www.centerforgreenschools.org/greenguide. The Princeton Review created its “Guide to 332 Green Colleges” in partnership with the Center for Green Schools at the U.S. Green Building Council.

The 332 school profiles in the guide feature essential information for applicants — facts and stats on school demographics, admission and financial aid — plus write-ups on the schools’ sustainability initiatives. A “Green Facts” sidebar reports on a wide range of topics from the school’s use of renewable energy sources, recycling and conservation programs to the availability of environmental studies and career guidance for green jobs.

In the guide’s profile, The Princeton Review highlights UW-Green Bay’s history as “Eco U,” and says the University’s “support of ecological research is both elaborate and wholehearted.” It mentions various UW-Green Bay courses and research opportunities, along with “green” building design features, and also highlights the University’s Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI).

Said Rob Franek, Senior VP/Publisher, The Princeton Review, “We are pleased to recommend UW-Green Bay to the many students seeking colleges that practice and promote environmentally-responsible choices and practices.”

Franek noted his Company’s recent survey findings indicating significant interest among college applicants in attending “green” colleges. Of more than 10,000 college applicants who participated in The Princeton Review’s “College Hopes & Worries Survey,” Franek noted, “61 percent said having information about a school’s commitment to the environment would influence their decision to apply to or attend the school.”

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Mark your calendars for Earth Week

As the “original Eco U,” UW-Green Bay has always taken a special interest in Earth Week. This year is no different with various people, clubs and committees planning an ambitious timeline of events — including a concert. Here is a first look. Full details later.

Monday, April 21 — Reducing Waste/Composting. Booth space outside the Phoenix Club, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Tuesday, April 22, Earth Day — Concert, Myles Coyne and the Rusty Nickel Band, folk, at the Union, time TBD.

Wednesday, April 23 — Conservation and Biodiversity booth near the Union ticket/info desk: Learn about invasive species, native species, litter facts and biodiversity. Ducks Unlimited speaker, Christie Theater, time TBD.

Thursday, April 24 — Water Recycling booth, Library Alcove: Learn about storm water, drinking water and the power of reusable bottles.

Friday, April 25 — Energy Conservation booth at the Garden Cafe near MAC Hall entrance.

A toast… to theatre, marketing, chemistry, wine

In late summer in Northeast Wisconsin, UW-Green Bay graduates and brothers Aric and Brad Schmiling delight in the metamorphosis… grapes change color, fill with natural sugar and expand to ideal size, perfect for harvesting, stomping, fermenting, tasting and celebrating. Continue reading

‘Eco U’ finds place in Princeton Review’s Guide to Green Colleges

The Princeton Reviews Guide to 322 Green CollegesThe University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is one of the 322 most environmentally responsible colleges in the United States and Canada, according to The Princeton Review.

The education services company features UW-Green Bay in the fourth annual edition of its free downloadable book, The Princeton Review’s Guide to 322 Green Colleges.

The Princeton Review chose the schools for this guide based on a 50-question survey it conducted in 2012 of administrators at hundreds of four-year colleges.

The Company analyzed data from the survey about the schools’ course offerings, campus infrastructure, activities and career preparation to measure their commitment to the environment and to sustainability.

In the guide’s profile on UW-Green Bay, The Princeton Review highlights the school’s historic mission and current-day offerings.

“UW-Green Bay is affectionately dubbed ‘Eco U,’” the profile begins. “Environmental research and applied ecological sciences were the focus of the institution’s educational philosophy at its inception.”

The publication goes on to mention:

• Student access to programs, courses, student research and internships in sustainability
• The Environmental Management and Business Institute
• Historically strong undergraduate and graduate programs in environmental sciences
• Capstone seminars in which students tackle high-level issues
• Dedicated recycling and environmental awareness programs
• Mary Ann Cofrin Hall and other energy-efficient features
• The on-campus Cofrin Memorial Arboretum and other natural area holdings

Schools are listed, but not ranked. Wisconsin schools in the guide are Marquette University, Northland College and the UW campuses at Eau Claire, Green Bay, Madison, Milwaukee, Oshkosh and Stevens Point.

Robert Franek, a senior vice president with The Princeton Review, says his company’s recent survey findings indicate significant interest among college applicants in attending “green” colleges. “Among (nearly 10,000) college applicants who participated in our 2013 ‘College Hopes & Worries Survey,’ 62 percent said having information about a school’s commitment to the environment would influence their decision to apply to or attend the school,” he said.

The Princeton Review created its Guide to 322 Green Colleges in partnership with the Center for Green Schools at the U.S. Green Building Council, with generous support from United Technologies Corp., founding sponsor of the Center for Green Schools.

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