Tag: diversity

Chancellor’s statement on tolerance, need for discussion

Already distributed campuswide, but repeated here for the record, is an email sent this morning to faculty, staff and students from UW-Green Bay Chancellor Gary L. Miller:

The recent events at the University of Missouri and elsewhere in the American Academy remind me of the importance of our commitment to diversity and tolerance, and our obligation to provide a welcoming and supportive campus for all students, faculty, staff and visitors.  I hope you will join me in reaffirming these values. I encourage you to engage each other and our students in discussions about the important issues of our time and to advance ideas and concerns that will help us improve our programs and our campus environment.  The free exchange of ideas and perspectives are founding principles of UWGB that will serve us well in this time. Thank you and Go Phoenix!

Letters sent to students at UW-Madison

The defacing of a publicity poster for a theater production at UW-Madison — with the faces of Asian actors colored in marker — prompted a letter from school officials, urging students to watch for and confront racial insensitivity. Another letter, this time from the UW School of Nursing dean, involved the words “white is also a color” scribbled on a poster about awards to outstanding women of color. See coverage.

The ‘New Latinos’ will be topic Oct. 21

The campus/community series “Latino Americans: 500 Years of History” continues this week with the screening of another film segment and a talk by a Peruvian-born author who will facilitate discussion during a program beginning at 6 p.m. Wednesday (Oct. 21) in the Christie Theatre of the University Union. “The New Latinos” is the topic of the guest speaker Marie Arana, a native of Lima, Peru, and the daughter of a Peruvian father and American mother. Her memoir, Chica: Two Worlds, One Childhood, was a finalist in various book competitions. The talk is the third in this year’s “Latino Americans: 500 Years of History” series organized by UW-Green Bay in conjunction with the American Library Association and a National Endowment for the Humanities grant.

Ally Conference 2015 targets social justice, inclusion, unity

The American Intercultural Center is extending an invitation to attend ‘You Have the Power to Rise — Rise Up,’ the 2015 UW-Green Bay Ally Conference taking place from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 24, at locations in Theatre Hall, MAC Hall and the Weidner Center. The conference will approach issues of diversity, social justice, access and equality, and provide a safe environment to celebrate diversity and the talents within all populations. This event is free to UW-Green Bay students. Keynote speaker for the evening dinner at the Weidner Center is Civil Rights activist Sheyann Webb-Christburg, the youngest participant (8 years old) in the “Bloody Sunday” march at Selma’s Edmund Pettus Bridge on March 7, 1965. Registrations are requested by Oct. 12. For more information and to register.

Faculty, staff to present at Ally Conference

The Oct. 24 diversity and equality conference at UW-Green Bay will feature presentations by a good many faculty and staff members of the University. As of this date, presenters include: Christin DePouw, Education; Joel Muraco, Human Development; Kristin Vespia, Human Development; Pao Lor, Education; Stacie Christian, Human Development; Kristy Aoki, Office of International Education; Jemma Lund, Office of International Education; Justin Mallett, American Intercultural Center; Mai Lo Lee, American Intercultural Center; Crystal Lepscier, American Intercultural Center; and Jeff Willems, Residence Life.

Juliet Cole is UWGB award winner for Outstanding Women of Color

The UW System has announced the 17 recipients of the 2015 Outstanding Women of Color in Education Award, an annual honor given to faculty, staff, students, or community members to recognize their contributions to diversity and the status of women within the UW System. At UW-Green Bay, the individual to be honored at the joint award program Oct. 9 in Madison is Juliet Cole, longtime staff member and associate director of the former Institute for Learning Partnership. For more information about the awards and past recipients.

Mallett seeks out fall Human Mosaic listings

Diversity Director Justin Mallett is inviting members of the University community to share with him information about fall 2015 programs that can be included in the Human Mosaic booklet and online directory. Multicultural and inclusive-excellence events taking place at UW-Green Bay during the fall semester will be included. Those interested may reply to Mallett with Name of Event, Location, Time, and Brief Description of Event. The deadline for submission for fall is Friday, July 17. Questions or suggestions? Contact Mallett at MallettJ@uwgb.edu.

‘Beyond Diversity: Generations in the Workplace’ on May 27

The professional development programming committees of the Academic Staff and University Staff are coming together to sponsor a program from 10 a.m. to noon next Wednesday (May 27) in the Alumni Rooms of the University Union. Guest presenter Theresa Zimmerman will address the topic “Beyond Diversity: Generations in the Workplace.” Organizers say rapid workplace transformation, globalization and changing demographics will require fresh managerial perspectives blending multiple generations and cultures. This workshop promises to take participants “beyond the traditional concept of diversity.” Register here.

Reminder: Social Work hosts ‘Critical Cultural Competency’ workshop

The Social Work Professional Program is sponsoring a workshop titled “Critical Cultural Competency” on Monday, June 15, in the Phoenix Room. This workshop, developed and facilitated by Crossroads Antiracism Organizing & Training is “designed to help participants create the spaces to be self-reflective about our cultural shaping as individuals and institutions, understand the power dynamics in society that impact us, develop the skills to interrupt old patterns and inequitable practices that limit access and exclude some people from our institutions, build trust and clear communication and begin to understand how to make decisions based on multiple perspectives where all people can be heard and represented.” The workshop is from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Participants are asked to commit to the full training. Lunch will be included as part of the program. Registration is free and is open to UW Green Bay faculty and staff, and community affiliates of Social Work. No students please. Attendance at this workshop may be used to meet a portion of the professional development requirements of the UW Green Bay Inclusive Excellence Certificate Program (in the topic of race, ethnicity, and/or national origin). If you have questions regarding how this activity will count toward your certificate, please email. Registration is limited to the first 70 respondents. If you are interested in attending, please complete the brief registration form. The workshop organizer, Jolanda Sallmann, will send you an email notification either confirming your seat for the workshop or indicating you have been placed on a waiting list. Please direct any questions to Jolanda Sallmann.

Lones, Blake pursue competitive summer research opportunities

lorenzo-top-storyWhile some students will spend summer in relaxation mode, UW-Green Bay’s Lorenzo Lones will be working in a lab at one of the top research programs in the nation.

Likewise, UW-Green Bay junior Tresavoya Blake, a History and Democracy and Justice Studies major, will be interning at Loyola University Chicago in its Multicultural Affairs Division this summer as part of a National Undergraduate Fellowship Program.

Each are mentored and encouraged by Justin Mallett, the director of UWGB’s American Intercultural Center.

Lones, a double major in Psychology and Human Biology, will be participating in the University of Iowa Summer Research Opportunity Program throughout June and July. The eight-week program is designed to prepare participants for future doctoral studies through involvement in research and other scholarly activities.

While at the University of Iowa, Lones will be working with Dr. Andrew Pieper, MD, Ph.D. and Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology and Radiation Oncology.

“One of the things that interested me is that the professor I will be working has a very diverse lab team,” said Lones, “He has women, Latinos, African-Americans, so it is just a very diverse team. Also, his research is closely aligned with the type of research I want to do in my career.”

Lones will be working with Pieper to study the effects of two chemicals on mice: One that helps create new brain cells in the memory center of the brain and one that helps stop cell death.

“We have a lot of psychiatric medication that deals with symptoms, but his lab is actually looking at what is causing the symptoms and trying to change the course of the disorder in the brain instead of just alleviating symptoms,” Lones said.

This experience will be a first for Lones who says he has never worked directly in a lab such as this before.

“This will be the first time I’m in the lab actually manipulating things,” he said, “As far as animals are concerned too, I’ll be working with the rats. So that will be a pretty nifty hands-on experience for me.”

Entering UWGB, he thought he would someday be a school psychologist. “I took Prof. Dennis Lorenz’s physiological psychology class and started studying the nervous system and then realized I really like understanding how the brain works.”

He followed that with a molecular biology course with Prof. Uwe Pott, and is honing his career path to research.

“What I want to study is not necessarily the act of giving treatment, but looking at what is the course of treatment… instead of of being a doctor, doing medical research that doctors can benefit from.”

Blake-storyFor Tresavoya Blake, the fellowship is an extension of involvement at UW-Green Bay. She laughs as she begins her list… “Women of Color, Black Student Union, the Diversity Taskforce…”

Her involvement provided a strong case for acceptance into the National Undergraduate Fellowship Program through the National Association for Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA), and the benefits associated with it — such as the eight-week fellowship at Loyola.

“I’ll be actually working with the different staff in different departments, working on any projects they might want me to do,” she said, “Basically learning more about the student affairs field and narrowing down which department or division of student affairs I would be most interested in pursuing when I go to graduate school and eventually start my own career in student affairs.”

Both Lones and Blakes said they understand the need for mentoring and appreciate the faculty and staff who support and encourage them.

“After my experiences here at Green Bay, especially in the American Intercultural Center, and seeing how they helped me just stay here and become more comfortable in the university, that’s the kind of impact I want to make on students in general,” Blake said. “In my future, I want to be the person that helps students of color, underrepresented students, and students in general, navigate through college.”

Lones said he is grateful to the faculty and staff that have helped him prepare for this opportunity, including Prof. Kris Vespia, who worked with him over winter break to help prepare his personal statement.

“The multicultural advisors, Crystal, Justin, and Mai, they do a really good job at keeping me on a straight path,” he said, “The faculty here at the school have been tremendous. They’ve been extremely supportive. I don’t know where I’d be without them.”

Story by Katelyn Staaben, editorial intern