Tag: convocation

Deadline is March 9 for Founders Association Awards of Excellence

The Awards and Recognition Committee is soliciting nominations for 2015 Founders Association Awards of Excellence to be presented at fall convocation. Anyone from the UW-Green Bay community (faculty, staff, students, and community members) may submit a nomination prior to the March 9 deadline. The nomination form is available electronically. The website includes descriptions of award criteria and a list of previous award winners.

Individuals and groups who have received the Founders Award for a given category within the last 15 years will not be eligible for that same category. Also, self-nominated individuals and groups will not receive consideration, nor will current members of the Awards and Recognition Committee. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Samantha Surowiec or Mary Valitchka, committee co-chairs, or members Jeremy Cleven, Clif Ganyard, Minkyu Lee, Cheryl Pieper, Erin Van Daalwyk, Lora Warner and Aaron Weinschenk.

Convocation redux: The day in words and pictures

In case you missed it in Friday’s Log Extra, we’ve got your complete Mid-Year Convocation recap to kick off the week. From service anniversaries to emeriti honors, a new endowed chair and Chancellor Gary Miller’s remarks, you can check it out, here:
Event recap, photo gallery
Service anniversaries, emeriti honorees
Radosevich honored as Cofrin Endowed Chair

Campus celebrates achievements, looks to the future during Convocation

top-story-convocationFaculty, staff and friends gathered to celebrate tradition and tomorrow Jan. 22, taking part in Mid-Year Convocation in the Phoenix Room.

As is customary during the winter event, individuals celebrating service milestones were honored for anniversaries ranging from 10 years to 40. Recognized for his four decades at UW-Green Bay, event emcee Prof. Cliff Abbott drew a standing ovation as the distinction was announced.

Also as part of the ceremony, two new academic staff emeriti were honored for their service to UW-Green Bay. Gary Fewless, longtime lecturer and curator of the University Herbarium that now bears his name; and Mike Herrity, former UW-Green Bay Registrar and academic adviser, were recognized. Neither was able to attend the event, but each received hearty applause as his citation was read.

Click here for more information about the service anniversary and emeriti honorees.

The University community also celebrated a brand-new distinction as Associate Prof. David Radosevich was formally recognized as the first-ever Austin E. Cofrin Endowed Chair of Business. The position is the University’s second endowed chair, joining the John P. Blair Endowed Chair in Communications, which was established in 2005. Click here for more on Radosevich and his honor.

Following the recognitions, Chancellor Gary L. Miller took the stage to deliver his Mid-Year Commencement remarks. The prepared text of his remarks is available here, and a summary is as follows:

 

Miller remarks: Challenges await but ‘the future is ours’

Chancellor Gary L. Miller painted a realistic yet forward-looking picture of the challenges and opportunities facing UW-Green Bay during his Mid-Year Convocation remarks Thursday, Jan. 22.

Speaking before faculty and staff members who assembled for the annual winter gathering, Miller offered updates on a variety of University activities and initiatives; addressed a bleak state budget picture; spoke about the future of shared governance and tenure; and concluded with a short-and longer-term look ahead.

“I am so excited about this place and its future,” Miller said. “The power we have to create our future through innovation, to transform the lives of many more students in this region by inviting them to join the extraordinary learning community, and to change this place to improve the human condition are limited only by our imagination. It is a great privilege to be your partner in this wonderful journey.”

Among the issues addressed:

Review of activities and initiatives

  • Miller welcomed Provost Stephen Fritz, who began his new role in January. Praising Fritz’s academic and leadership background, Miller expressed confidence in the provost’s ability to lead during what will be an important time of transition for UW-Green Bay.
  • The enrollment issue continues to be a challenge for UW-Green Bay, Miller said, but he praised progress that has been made (and thanked the majority of people present for their efforts in just a few short months) in analyzing enrollment’s effect on the budget; addressing various enrollment needs; and partnering with the Green Bay community. “We have much to do about enrollment,” Miller said, “and we’ll continue to look at this process. I’m very excited about where we are versus six months ago.”
  • Miller also addressed his “Invent the Future” transition initiative and lauded the work of faculty and staff members who comprise its steering committee and working groups. The process will conclude during spring semester, leaving leadership with “a deep catalog of innovations and recommendations upon which we can draw as we shape our future.”
  • Continuing with the theme of looking ahead, Miller spoke about the University’s new planning process, which will be guided in large part by the University Planning and Innovation Committee (UPIC). During spring semester, this group will take on an “ambitious curriculum” of learning about budgets, enrollments, the regulatory environment, athletics and other areas in an effort to inform better planning and allow the University a better strategic position in the years ahead.

The state budget

Miller offered a sobering assessment of the state budget, noting that while concrete information is lacking, the UW System is likely to face a significant and potentially painful cut during the next biennium. Even as specifics remain unknown, Miller emphasized the need for a “strong, transparent and inclusive budget reduction and reallocation process.”

That process will be spearheaded by Provost Fritz, who will organize the development of recommendations for reductions and reallocations based on advice from numerous leaders and stakeholders. The UPIC will vet those recommendations before they are submitted to the Cabinet and ultimately himself, Miller said. Regular town hall-style meetings will be held to communicate activities, answer questions and get ideas.

“The coming round of reductions,” Miller said, “will not diminish this University or alter our course to greatness.”

Shared governance and System flexibility

Shared governance and tenure are likely to be moved from state statute, Miller said, with the authority for both transferred to the UW System Board of Regents. And while he said such a move is neither optimal nor desirable, Miller reiterated his steadfast support for both provisions and expressed his confidence that the change would not diminish shared governance or threaten tenure.

“These institutions are part of the higher education systems in all 50 states,” Miller said, “and continue to survive attempts to alter or dissolve them, primarily because everyone understands they are both essential to the capacity of this great enterprise.”

The chancellor also addressed efforts to secure increased flexibility for the UW System, clarifying certain aspects of the proposal while inviting those assembled to ask questions if they seek additional information.

Additional flexibilities won’t prevent drastic state budget cuts — “the fact is, the state budget’s in extremely bad shape,” Miller said — but it will be beneficial in the long term as the Board of Regents, not the Legislature, guides UW System recovery and growth in the future. Miller is a “strong supporter” of obtaining the additional flexibilities, he said.

‘The future is ours’

Miller concluded his address on a high note, reiterating the powers of transformation, innovation and place and looking ahead to UW-Green Bay’s 50th Anniversary celebration.

“The excitement of this celebration is what will take us into the next half century,” Miller said. “The thrill of designing a future for this University. The possibility of even greater things to come. These are the things I think about every day, and when I talk to you, this is what I hear coming back from you.

“And I am so fortunate to be with you on this great journey. Let’s have a great year — it’s a New Year — and Go Phoenix!”

(Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.)
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Photos by Sue Bodilly, Marketing and University Communication

Miller Convocation remarks: Challenges await but ‘the future is ours’

Chancellor Gary Miller speaks at mid-year convocation

Chancellor Gary L. Miller painted a realistic yet forward-looking picture of the challenges and opportunities facing UW-Green Bay during his Mid-Year Convocation remarks Thursday, Jan. 22.

Speaking before faculty and staff members who assembled for the annual winter gathering, Miller offered updates on a variety of University activities and initiatives; addressed a bleak state budget picture; spoke about the future of shared governance and tenure; and concluded with a short-and longer-term look ahead.

“I am so excited about this place and its future,” Miller said. “The power we have to create our future through innovation, to transform the lives of many more students in this region by inviting them to join the extraordinary learning community, and to change this place to improve the human condition are limited only by our imagination. It is a great privilege to be your partner in this wonderful journey.”

Among the issues addressed:

Review of Activities and Initiatives

— Miller welcomed Provost Stephen Fritz, who began his new role in January. Praising Fritz’s academic and leadership background, Miller expressed confidence in the provost’s ability to lead during what will be an important time of transition for UW-Green Bay.

— The enrollment issue continues to be a challenge for UW-Green Bay, Miller said, but he praised progress that has been made (and thanked the majority of people present for their efforts in just a few short months) in analyzing enrollment’s effect on the budget; addressing various enrollment needs; and partnering with the Green Bay community. “We have much to do about enrollment,” Miller said, “and we’ll continue to look at this process. I’m very excited about where we are versus six months ago.”

— Miller also addressed his “Invent the Future” transition initiative and lauded the work of faculty and staff members who comprise its steering committee and working groups. The process will conclude during spring semester, leaving leadership with “a deep catalog of innovations and recommendations upon which we can draw as we shape our future.”

— Continuing with the theme of looking ahead, Miller spoke about the University’s new planning process, which will be guided in large part by the University Planning and Innovation Committee (UPIC). During spring semester, this group will take on an “ambitious curriculum” of learning about budgets, enrollments, the regulatory environment, athletics and other areas in an effort to inform better planning and allow the University a better strategic position in the years ahead.

The State Budget

Miller offered a sobering assessment of the state budget, noting that while concrete information is lacking, the UW System is likely to face a significant and potentially painful cut during the next biennium. Even as specifics remain unknown, Miller emphasized the need for a “strong, transparent and inclusive budget reduction and reallocation process.”

That process will be spearheaded by Provost Fritz, who will organize the development of recommendations for reductions and reallocations based on advice from numerous leaders and stakeholders. The UPIC will vet those recommendations before they are submitted to the Cabinet and ultimately himself, Miller said. Regular town hall-style meetings will be held to communicate activities, answer questions and get ideas.

“The coming round of reductions,” Miller said, “will not diminish this University or alter our course to greatness.”

Shared Governance and System Flexibility

Shared governance and tenure are likely to be moved from state statute, Miller said, with the authority for both transferred to the UW System Board of Regents. And while he said such a move is neither optimal nor desirable, Miller reiterated his steadfast support for both provisions and expressed his confidence that the change would not diminish shared governance or threaten tenure.

“These institutions are part of the higher education systems in all 50 states,” Miller said, “and continue to survive attempts to alter or dissolve them, primarily because everyone understands they are both essential to the capacity of this great enterprise.”

The chancellor also addressed efforts to secure increased flexibility for the UW System, clarifying certain aspects of the proposal while inviting those assembled to ask questions if they seek additional information.

Additional flexibilities won’t prevent drastic state budget cuts — “the fact is, the state budget’s in extremely bad shape,” Miller said — but it will be beneficial in the long term as the Board of Regents, not the Legislature, guides UW System recovery and growth in the future. Miller is a “strong supporter” of obtaining the additional flexibilities, he said.

‘The Future is Ours’

Miller concluded his address on a high note, reiterating the powers of transformation, innovation and place and looking ahead to UW-Green Bay’s 50th Anniversary celebration.

“The excitement of this celebration is what will take us into the next half century,” Miller said. “The thrill of designing a future for this University. The possibility of even greater things to come. These are the things I think about every day, and when I talk to you, this is what I hear coming back from you.

“And I am so fortunate to be with you on this great journey. Let’s have a great year — it’s a New Year — and Go Phoenix!”

The full prepared text of Miller’s remarks is available on the UW-Green Bay Chancellor’s website.

Employees honored for emeriti status, years of service to UW-Green Bay

Gary Fewless

UW-Green Bay faculty and staff members gathered together Jan. 22 to celebrate the annual Mid-Year Convocation, a ceremony that serves as the unofficial kickoff to the University’s spring semester. The formal program included granting of emeriti status to distinguished retirees, as well as years-of-service recognition for longtime UW-Green Bay employees.

Emeritus Honorees

Two academic staff members were granted emeritus status in recognition of their service to UW-Green Bay.

Michael Herrity

Michael Herrity

Longtime lecturer and curator of the University Herbarium — now renamed in his honor — Gary Fewless was recognized for his “unrivaled devotion to science, students and the priceless environmental diversity of our region.”

Former UW-Green Bay Registrar and academic adviser Michael Herrity was honored “for a distinguished career in service to students, community and the power of higher education.” Neither Fewless nor Herrity was able to attend, but both received generous applause as their citations were read.

Years of Service Honorees

Years-of-Service Awards, 25 years plus

UW-Green Bay faculty and staff members celebrating 40-, 35- and 30-year anniversaries during Mid-Year Convocation posed for a photo at the program’s conclusion. They are (L-R) Cliff Abbott (40), Bob Howe (30), Mike Stearney (30), Dave Kieper (35) and Mark Damie (35).

Years-of-Service Awards, 20 years

UW-Green Bay faculty and staff members marking 20- and 25-year anniversaries at the Jan. 22 gathering were (L-R) Jeff Benzow (25), Donna Ritch (25), Linda Toonen (25), Stephen Gering (20), Deb Anderson (25), Mike Kline (25), Dianne Gordon (25), Christine Terrien (20), Bill Hubbard (25), Sherry Lacenski (25) and Colleen Wilde (25).

Years-of-Service Awards, 10 years

Gathering for a group photo of those honored for 10-year employment anniversaries were Mary Valitchka, Bob Blihar, Diane Nagy, Eric Amenson, Bonnie Delsart, Jeff Gross, Atife Caglar, Katrina Hrivnak, Javier Martinez, Brent Blahnik, Darrel Renier, Joe Brzezinski, Judi Pietsch, Janet Reilly and Paula Marcec.

School of Business’ Radosevich honored as inaugural Cofrin Endowed Chair

Radosevich honored as Cofrin Endowed ChairUW-Green Bay honored the institution’s first-ever Austin E. Cofrin Endowed Chair of Business during Mid-Year Convocation ceremonies Jan. 22.

Associate Prof. David J. Radosevich, chair of UW-Green Bay’s Master’s of Management program, was recognized and presented with a ceremonial medallion during the annual winter gathering of faculty and staff. He began his term as endowed professor Jan. 1, and will serve an initial appointment extending through June 30, 2018. The appointment is renewable on a 3-year basis thereafter.

UW-Green Bay Chancellor Gary L. Miller presided over the medallion ceremony, praising Radosevich’s past achievements while keeping an eye on the future.

“He is someone who will interact effectively and proactively with business leaders, colleagues and key stakeholders,” Miller said. “I am confident his work will honor the innovative legacy of Austin E. Cofrin, and help elevate our School of Business to even higher levels of achievement.”

Cofrin founded the Fort Howard Paper Co. in 1919 and turned the Green Bay-based manufacturer into one of the world’s largest tissue products companies. He died in 1980 at the age of 96. Industry colleagues praised Cofrin for his visionary leadership and resourcefulness in solving problems, achieving efficiencies and anticipating new markets.

It was a desire to more fully honor Austin Cofrin that led his son, Dr. David A. Cofrin, shortly before his death in August 2009, to announce a $5.5 million gift to the University. That contribution, the largest single private gift for academics in school history, provided funding for the endowed chair and other academic enhancements, and led to UW-Green Bay renaming its business program the Austin E. Cofrin School of Business. Taken collectively, Business Administration, Accounting and the Master’s of Management account for about 1,000 students and more than 6,000 alumni, or roughly one-fifth of all current and former students.

Radosevich has been a member of the Business Administration faculty at UW-Green Bay since 2003. He has been a frequent consultant to leading companies in the areas of executive assessment, selection, training, needs assessment, and performance management. Clients have included Wal-Mart, Schering Plough, New York State Police, Bell Atlantic and several other Fortune 500 companies.

His research examines variables in personal motivation and how individuals strive for goals over time. He has published extensively in journals including the Journal of Applied Psychology, International Journal of Business Research, Review of Business Research and Innovate. Additionally, he has studied the impact of technology in the classroom on student learning and satisfaction. He has taught courses in leadership and team development, organizational change and behavior, human resource management, research methods, statistics and psychology.

Radosevich received his bachelor’s in psychology from Western Maryland College in 1994 and his Ph.D. in industrial/organizational psychology from the University at Albany, State University of New York in 1999.

An endowed chair is a faculty position in a focused area of importance to the University. The chair is filled by a distinguished faculty member who has a national or international reputation in his or her field. The other endowed chair at UW-Green Bay is the John P. Blair Endowed Chair in Communication, created in 2005 and filled by Prof. Timothy Meyer until his retirement in 2013, when Prof. Phillip Clampitt was named to the position.

The Austin E. Cofrin School of Business is in the process of joining a select group of national peers by pursuing accreditation through the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. Chancellor Miller says the addition of an endowed chair to the program, along with the excellence in teaching, research and community service exemplified by Radosevich and his colleagues, should be positive factors as UW-Green Bay prepares for AACSB review.

Reminder: Tomorrow’s Mid-Year Convocation

Here’s a quick reminder that the annual UW-Green Bay Mid-Year Faculty and Staff Convocation will take place at 10:30 a.m. tomorrow (Thursday) in the Phoenix Room of the University Union. We’ll recognize employees marking significant service anniversaries, applaud Austin E. Cofrin Endowed Chair honoree David J. Radosevich and emeriti Gary Fewless and Mike Herrity, and hear a semester-opening update from Chancellor Gary L. Miller. Followed by lunch. To register for lunch, please RSVP with Paula Marcec in the Chancellor’s Office at marcecp@uwgb.edu.
 

Abbott, Damie, Kieper head seniority list for next week’s Convocation

Please join faculty and staff colleagues in turning out for the annual UW-Green Bay Mid-Year Convocation at 10:30 a.m. next Thursday (Jan. 22) in the Phoenix Room. As always, one of the highlights will be our collective congratulation extended to co-workers celebrating significant service anniversaries. Eligible for recognition are:

40 years — Cliff Abbott
35 years — Mark Damie, David Kieper
30 years — Forrest Baulieu, Illene Cupit, Jeffrey Entwistle, Robert Howe, Michael Stearney, Matthew Williams
25 years — Deb Anderson, Jeffrey Benzow, Dianne Gordon, Bill Hubbard, Mike Kline, Sherry Lacenski, Donna Ritch, Linda Toonen, Donna Van Straten, Colleen Wilde
20 Years — Theresa Adsit, Denise Carlson-Gardner, Marcelo Cruz, Stephen Gering, Karla Larson, Jeanette Skwor, Christine Terrien
10 years — Eric Amenson, Brent Blahnik, Bob Blihar, Joe Brzezinski, Atife Caglar, Bonnie Delsart, Sabrina Duchateau, Jeff Gross, Katrina Hrivnak, Mark Kiehn, Javier Martinez, Diane Nagy, Judi Pietsch, Janet Reilly, Darrel Renier, Jolanda Sallmann, Tammy Snortum, Mary Valitchka

Reminder: Mid-year convocation is next Thursday

It’s the annual UW-Green Bay Mid-Year Faculty and Staff Convocation, set for 10:30 a.m. next Thursday (Jan. 22) in the Phoenix Room of the University Union. We’ll recognize employees marking significant service anniversaries, applaud Austin E. Cofrin Endowed Chair honoree David J. Radosevich and emeriti Gary Fewless and Mike Herrity, and hear a semester-opening update from Chancellor Gary L. Miller. Followed by lunch. To register for lunch, please RSVP with Paula Marcec in the Chancellor’s Office at marcecp@uwgb.edu.

Convocation remarks, reminder: Offer your thoughts on Chancellor’s speech

Chancellor Gary L. Miller offered gratitude for a warm welcome, a look toward the University’s future and — lest we forget — the promise of ice cream during his Wednesday convocation. He also asked the convocation crowd of 500 to answer a one-question online survey on his remarks. (Some initial users might have experienced a glitch in accessing the survey; we’re told it has since been fixed.) We’ve linked to both, here:
Chancellor’s remarks
Survey