Tag: Cofrin Arboretum

‘BestColleges’ article includes shout-out to Cofrin Arboretum

As always, take online articles and “Best of” lists with multiple large grains of salt, but we will nevertheless note here that the website BestCollegesOnline.org has published an article headlined “The 50 Most Amazing University Botanical Gardens and Arboretums in the U.S.” UW-Green Bay’s Cofrin Memorial Arboretum made the list. It’s actually a decent and apparently well-sourced article — read more.

Raduenz returns for dedication of Cofrin Arboretum woods in his name

A ceremony was held this morning (Friday, May 15) to dedicate “Les Raduenz Woods,” a 22-acre forest/woodland south of Circle Drive across from the Office of Facilities Management. Raduenz was a central figure in development of the Cofrin Arboretum and UW-Green Bay campus for 35 years until his retirement in 2006 as director of Facilities Management, a position he held for 12 years. Raduenz took a special interest in this area, overseeing a tree planting program that has led to its conversion into an early successional woodland and, eventually, an extension of Mahon Woods, one of the Arboretum’s most important natural features. Others who contributed significantly to the development of Les Raduenz Woods included faculty members Dr. Keith White, Dr. Paul Sager, and founding Chancellor Edward Weidner; Facilities Management staff members Mike Vanlanen, Lylas Dequaine, Dennis Nellis, Jim Stiefvater, and Paul Pinkston; and students like Neil Diboll, who eventually became a pioneer in ecological restoration through the establishment of his company, Prairie Nursery, located near Westfield, Wis. For an aerial photo map of the area, pre-campus 1960 and current day.

Les Raduenz Woods dedicated in campus arboretum

Raduenz-WoodsEditor’s note:  For an enlarged version  — which shows  a current day aerial of campus and the Les Raduenz Woods (outlined in green) with inset images from 1960 (pre-campus and mostly farm fields) and 1992 (transitional stage of arboretum development) — click on image above.

A ceremony was held Friday (May 15) to dedicate “Les Raduenz Woods,” a 22-acre forest/woodland south of Circle Drive across from the Office of Facilities Management. Raduenz was a central figure in development of the Cofrin Arboretum and UW-Green Bay campus for 35 years. He retired in 2006 as director of Facilities Management, a position he held for 12 years. Raduenz took a special interest in this area, overseeing a tree planting program that has led to its conversion into an early successional woodland and, eventually, an extension of Mahon Woods, one of the Arboretum’s most important natural features. Others who contributed significantly to the development of Les Raduenz Woods included faculty members Dr. Keith White, Dr. Paul Sager, and founding Chancellor Edward Weidner; Facilities Management staff members Mike Vanlanen, Lylas Dequaine, Dennis Nellis, Jim Stiefvater, and Paul Pinkston; and students like Neil Diboll, who eventually became a pioneer in ecological restoration through the establishment of his company, Prairie Nursery, located near Westfield, Wis.

Snapshots: The junk they find in the Arboretum

The Round River Alliance student organization just completed its third annual Campus Cleanup event, focused on the Arboretum surrounding the campus. Not surprisingly, it seems those areas bordering major roads can be hot spots for litter and dumping — with plenty of debris found along Bay Settlement Road near the tower and Niagara Escarpment. For a look at the metal, plastic, paper and old-building-material “bounty,” check out the Round River Facebook page.
 

Dry weather frustrates prairie fire, for now


If it’s April, it must be time for the seasonal controlled burn to reinvigorate the Keith White Prairie in the UW-Green Bay Cofrin Memorial Arboretum, adjacent to South Circle Drive. Originally scheduled for last Wednesday, the burn was postponed because of the windy, tinder-dry conditions that have led to burn bans (and plenty of grass fires) over much of Wisconsin. We’ll keep you posted.

Senior earns Sager award for work on Marinette County aquifer


The winner of this year’s Sager Scholarship is Christa Kananen, a senior majoring in Geoscience with a minor in Environmental Science. Her paper “Drawdown of the Potentiometric Surface of the Cambrian-Ordovician Aquifer in Marinette County” was based on her undergraduate research project under the guidance of NAS Associate Prof. John Luczaj. The Sager Scholarship for Scientific Writing was established by retired UW-Green Bay faculty members Paul and Dorothea Sager in memory of Chancellor Emeritus Edward Weidner and his commitment to UW-Green Bay and the Cofrin Arboretum. The $1,000 scholarship is awarded to a UW-Green Bay undergraduate who has demonstrated excellence in scientific writing resulting from a classroom or extracurricular academic activity. Students receiving honorable mention for this year’s competition were Reed Heintzkill, Courtney Pagenkopf, Holly Plamann, Alex Stenner and Timothy Zietz.

Summer Solstice runners log 70, 80 miles on Arboretum trails… IN ONE DAY!

The Green Bay Running Club welcomed 96 ultra-marathoners for the club’s annual “Summer Solstice Challenge” last Saturday, June 28. The event invites hard-core runners to maximize one of the longest days of the year by going sun-up to sun-down for up to 15.5 hours of daylight. The club holds the event on the UW-Green Bay campus including the trails of the Cofrin Memorial Arboretum, with campus volunteers such as Mike Kline, Kelly Franz and Lee Reinke and his crew at Shorewood Golf Course, as well as Athletics trainer Callie Bartel, helping with arrangements. Top distances in the respective divisions:

15.5 Hour Run
Male: Ryan Norton – 80.75 miles
Female: Jen Binns – 72.15 miles

8 Hour
Male: Brady Sturm – 47.5 miles
Female: Christine Crawford – 43.65 miles

6 Hour
Male: Mike Cavanaugh – 35.85 miles
Female: Lynne Moore – 34.15 miles

For those interested in more modest distances, the Green Bay Running Club will return to campus for one of its periodic “fun runs” at 6 p.m. Tuesday (July 8), with participants gathering in the Shorewood Golf Course parking lot for a 5-mile outing. Open to all.
 

Photos: March to depart, but winter hangs around

Welcome Spring, UW-Green BayThe last week of March is often a time for the first signs of spring on the UW-Green Bay campus. In 2014, those signs are a little harder to see. University photographer Eric Miller took advantage of the longer days during March’s final week to document signs of the season.

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Welcome Spring, UW-Green Bay, March 2014Welcome Spring, UW-Green Bay, March 2014Welcome Spring, UW-Green Bay, March 2014Welcome Spring, UW-Green Bay, March 2014Welcome Spring, UW-Green Bay, March 2014Welcome Spring, UW-Green Bay, March 2014Welcome Spring, UW-Green Bay, March 2014Welcome Spring, UW-Green Bay, March 2014Welcome Spring, UW-Green Bay, March 2014Welcome Spring, UW-Green Bay, March 2014Welcome Spring, UW-Green Bay, March 2014Welcome Spring, UW-Green Bay, March 2014

— Photos by Eric Miller, photographer, Office of Marketing and University Communication

Not on cold schools list, but frozen campus snapshots are making the rounds

Perhaps our much-lauded tunnels are to thank for UW-Green Bay’s exclusion from a recently released list of coldest colleges in the country — but that hasn’t stopped icy pictures taken from campus from hitting the news wires to show just how cold it’s gotten here. Fox 11 News had a fun story on the list from the College Prowler website, which lists Lawrence University as the 15th coldest college in the country. UW-Green Bay, UW Oshkosh and St. Norbert in De Pere are among area schools not on the list, while fellow UWs such as Stout and Eau Claire were among those designated (when it comes to UWEC, at least one member of your Log news team can vouch for its inclusion. That footbridge over the Chippewa River is no joke). And while UW-Green Bay didn’t make the list, some Associated Press pics taken from our own Cofrin Arboretum have been making the media rounds, used to illustrate the frigid beauty of the deep freeze. You can check out a couple of examples, along with the Fox 11 story, here:

http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?section=news/local/wisconsin&id=9382499

http://bismarcktribune.com/news/national/experts-warn-of-frostbite-dead-batteries-in-cold/article_3d61a3d7-08f6-5a81-ab7f-59e26bd50224.html

http://www.fox11online.com/news/local/fox-cities/lawrence-university-ranked-one-of-coldest-colleges

Making a difference: Annual ‘Steps’ walk raises funds for nonprofits

Nearly 100 participants laced up their walking shoes Saturday, Oct. 19, taking to the Cofrin Memorial Arboretum trails for the eighth annual UW-Green Bay Steps to Make a Difference Walk.

Held to celebrate national Make a Difference Day, this year’s event raised more than $3,000 for four local nonprofit organizations that were chosen by student organizers. Court Appointed Special Advocates of Brown County (CASA), Fox/Wolf Watershed Alliance, Harmony Café of Green Bay and Literacy Green Bay are the beneficiaries of this year’s walk.

“We at CASA of Brown County are so appreciative of being chosen as a charity recipient for the very well-organized and hugely successful Steps to Make a Difference Walk,” said Connie Greenawald, CASA director. “The students involved should all be very proud, as not only did the walk raise funds for four organizations, but it and they also raised awareness, which sometimes can be even more valuable. Thank you to all who participated — you have invested in the abused and neglected children of Brown County.”

Organized by UW-Green Bay’s Phoenix Philanthropy Club and the Center for Public Affairs, the student-led walk offered participants their choice of a two-or four-mile course along the beautiful fall-color-filled trails of the Cofrin Arboretum. The event offers a terrific chance for students to get involved, said Teresa Wroblewski, Philanthropy Club president and Steps to Make a Difference Walk chair.

“The Steps to Make a Difference Walk is about providing students with the opportunity to organize a fundraiser, while making a difference along the way,” Wroblewski said. “Students work firsthand with four local nonprofits, by not only raising money for them, but also by raising awareness of why these nonprofits matter in the community. This is a great way for students to not only get involved but also to show that they care about the future well-being of our community.”

More information about the Steps to Make a Difference Walk is available online and on Facebook.

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