Tag: Art


43rd Annual Juried Student Art Exhibition

The Lawton Gallery’s annual juried art exhibition is open to any student enrolled at UW-Green Bay. Consisting solely of student work in a variety of media, the recent exhibition was guest juried by Kendra Bulgrin, director of the James May Gallery in Algoma. All Lawton Gallery events are free and open to the public.

Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view or view the album on Flickr.

– Photos by Kayla Ermer, UW-Green Bay Photography Student


Sherman, Gates present The Flax Project in ‘After Thoughts’ talk Nov. 3

The re-creation of the ancient processing technique of turning flax to linen will be a topic of UW-Green Bay’s next After Thoughts presentation of the 2015-16 season.

UW-Green Bay Associate Professor of Medieval History and Archeology, Heidi Sherman, and Associate Professor of Fiber Arts, Alison Gates, will present “The Flax Project” Tuesday, Nov. 3, in the Grand Foyer of the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts on campus at 2420 Nicolet Drive.

Historian Sherman and textile artist Gates will share their experiences working across academic disciplines and across the ages as they perfect the art and practice of growing a fiber crop and processing the harvest on a college campus. Sherman and Gates, along with an outstanding undergraduate researcher, grew and processed their first successful crop in 2011. Since then, they have planted successful crops each year with a team of new students from History, Art and several other majors. The project grew out of earlier research at UW-Green Bay suggesting linen made from flax was a history-changing development for societies including the ancient Greeks, who used it to construct lightweight, virtually impenetrable battle armor. The Flax Project is funded through grants from the UWGB Research Council, the Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the Office of the Provost.

Now in its fifth full season, After Thoughts seeks to connect members of the community with UW-Green Bay. The gatherings showcase talented women among University faculty, staff and alumni, and convene men and women after their workday for learning, enrichment and fun.

After Thoughts begins with a 5 p.m. reception, followed by the presentation by Sherman and Gates beginning at 5:45 p.m. Each After Thoughts event is located in the Grand Foyer of the Weidner Center at UW-Green Bay and is from 5 to 7 p.m. The event begins with time to socialize, network, and enjoy hors d’oeuvres before the featured presentation.

Seating for After Thoughts is limited, so advanced registration is recommended. The cost of each program is $15. To reserve your spot, send a check (payable to UW-Green Bay Foundation) to: UW-Green Bay Foundation, CL 805, 2420 Nicolet Drive, Green Bay, WI 54311; or register online at https://secure.qgiv.com/for/afterthoughts. Walk-up registration also is an option. For any questions or comments regarding After Thoughts, please contact Mary Rass at rassm@uwgb.edu or (920) 465-2553. You can also find After Thoughts on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/afterthoughts.uwgb. Visit www.uwgb.edu/afterthoughts/ for more information about the series.


Artist Barbi Gossen in the UWGB Art Metals studio holding a piece of an alumni award

Exceptionally special Alumni Awards

For the past few months, inside UW-Green Bay’s Studio Arts Lab 112, jewelry artist Barbi Gossen has feverishly sketched, etched, sanded and soldered her intricate creations to the end result — the 2015 Alumni Awards.

In celebration of UW-Green Bay’s 50th Anniversary year, the Alumni Association commissioned Gossen, a 2003 UW-Green Bay graduate and award winning jewelry artist, to handcraft the beautiful works of art in time for the Oct. 16 awards ceremony.

Gossen was recognized at the annual event, along with the award recipients: Mark King, class of 1981, Barbara Nick ’83 and Jack Potts ’71, each receiving the Distinguished Alumni Award, and Andy Rosendahl, ’07 and Kelly Ruh ’01receiving the Outstanding Recent Alumni Award. Ronald and Suzy Pfeifer were presented with an Honorary Alumni Award.

Gossen says she was honored to be the selected artist for this project.

“I am really proud of these sculptures, and proud to shoulder the reputation of our tremendous art program we have at UWGB,” she said. “To be able to provide a small hand-made sculpture that these distinguished honorees are proud to display and care for is an honor.”

The Outstanding Recent Alumni Award was designed to show the rebirth of the Phoenix. Gossen explains in her artist statement: ”As each new generation goes forth, they go out into the world with the education, experience, and ideas that are unique to UWGB. As the flame rises from the swirled wings (symbolic of a nest), we rise from the safe haven of our professors, mentors, and friends. We grow to meet challenges that arise in our lives and the community around us. This award symbolizes new alumni drawing on their experiences to be reborn in the world and make a positive impact.”

The Distinguished Alumni Award symbolizes the greatness of UWGB’s more experienced alumni. “I wanted the complexity of shape and height to represent greatness and the exalted status of this award’s recipients. This award took far more time to sculpt and plan than the others in this series. Mastery of materials and complexity of technique, to me, are metaphors for the recipients of this award. Only after time, effort, and continued learning have these recipients grown to show there true potential,” she said.

The Honorary Alumni Award was designed to change with every perspective. “The front view shows all various pieces in a line revealing the wing as a whole with the school’s 50th logo as a centerpiece. This symbolizes all the things that must come together just right to make our university great. We need the support of the community around us and recognize those who’s support and commitment to our community and university make us complete.”

Gossen started with research about the idea of a Phoenix and what it has represented through time. She followed with hundreds of sketches until she had a “contender piece” which would be put through “training” — redrawing and redeveloping ideas into a refined design. Each was made more to scale and colored before being submitted for approval from colleagues, and finally for approval through the UWGB Alumni Association.

The tedious construction began with each piece copied or traced from the original. Some parts were easy and others required sawing for hours on end. Each was then carefully filed and sanded, before being cleaned and prepared for etching — a less than perfect process which requires many touch-ups by hand before pounding and shaping, soldering and finishing touches.

“I am really proud of these,” Gossen said. “I think by showing the process, and what really goes into the art, the pieces will be more valued. As an artist, you question your work constantly. There is high anxiety because you put so much of yourself into this…”

More about artist Barbara (Barbi) Gossen

An award-winning jewelry artist, Gossen is also an adjunct professor at her alma mater and has also taught Kent State where she earned a Master of Fine Arts degree, as well as the Cleveland Institute of Art, Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, and the Peninsula Art School. She has shown across the country in various Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG) shows, enamelist society shows and multiple times at Japan’s International Cloisonné Jewelry Contest. She earned “the award for encouragement” from the 20th International Cloisonné Jewelry Contest, an “emerging artist award” from the Peninsula Art School, and was a student finalist for the 2008 NICHE award. Her work has been published in books including 500 Earrings, and 500 Enameled Objects.

Enjoy the photo gallery featuring Gossen’s work in progress.

Photos by UWGB Marketing and University Communication staff member Kimberly Vlies.

(Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.)

Art faculty of UW-Green Bay (age 50) to exhibit at Neville Museum (age 100)

The teaching faculty of UW-Green Bay have been invited to exhibit art at the Neville Public Museum in co-celebration of the museum’s 100th anniversary and the University’s 50th. The anniversary art show will run from Jan. 22 to March 13, 2016 on the mezzanine of the museum. Participating faculty are Kristy Deetz, Sarah Detweiler, Carol Emmons, Alison Gates, Barbara Gossen, Minkyu Lee, Mark Sauter, Alison Stehlik and Christine Style.

UWGB faculty participate in boosting liberal education

On Thursday and Friday, Sept. 24 and 25, seven UW-Green Bay faculty members traveled to Madison to attend “Connecting Your Work to LEAP Wisconsin: A Faculty Collaboratives Conference.”

Organized by the UW System and AACU — the national Association of American Colleges and Universities — the conference focused on strategies for providing he highest quality learning experiences for students, connecting essential learning outcomes to institutional disciplines, and assessing student learning.

The nationwide LEAP initiative (Liberal Education and America’s Promise) seeks to advance liberal learning and high-quality undergraduate education for all students. Wisconsin and the UW System were pilot partners when the campaign launched in 2005. Workshops at the recent Madison conference included Advocacy, Signature Work, Tuning, Providing Evidence of Student Learning, Curriculum Mapping for General Education, and Value Rubrics.

The UW-Green Bay participants (from left, photo below) were JP Leary, assistant professor, First Nations Studies; Jennifer Ham, associate professor, Humanistic Studies; Heidi Fencl, professor and chair, Physics; Alison Gates, associate professor and chair, Art; Doreen Higgins, associate professor, Social Work; Kate Burns, associateprofessor and chair, Psychology and Human Development; and Matt Dornbush, associate vice provost for academic affairs and director of graduate Studies.


Final bow for WC Gallery

A friend tipped us off to a Facebook post advertising the final exhibit at the Midwest’s smallest art gallery, the WC Gallery at the De Pere home of former UW-Green Bay Curator of Art Stephen Perkins. After 13 years of curating sometimes whimsical, sometimes provocative, always engaging shows in his rather small downstairs bathroom (the water closet, or WC, as Brits sometimes call it), Perkins is relocating to Madison. You can see photos and a history of the WC Gallery.


UWGB connections provide heavy lifting for art event

UW-Green Bay art faculty member Professor Christine Style, as well as a number of UWGB alumni, staff and current students, found a unique way to put ink on paper recently — a multi-ton steamroller.

The Steamroller Print event on September 5-6 was part of a multifaceted “Exquisite Corpse” project organized by Hardy Gallery in Ephraim, Wis. with Style’s guidance.

The Village of Ephraim steamroller was used as a giant printing press, rolling over the inked boards to transfer an image onto paper to create six-foot high printed figures. Twenty artists carved woodblocks for the steamroller print event included eight UWGB students and alumni along with other Door County artists.

In addition to guiding the steamroller prints, Style was the project organizer for a the Exquisite Corpse Print Exchange. Style solicited and recruited 28 Wisconsin artists from throughout the state to design and produce an original print edition of either the head, torso, waist or legs section — later to be randomly combined to complete seven 44-inch high full figures that are on display in The Hardy Gallery.

Digital images of the exchange prints were then used by Prof. Style to design and produce interactive flipbooks that are for sale at The Hardy Gallery. “The Exquisite Corpse Head-to-Toe and End-to-End” exhibit continues through October 13 at The Hardy Gallery on the Anderson Dock. One full set of 28 11″ x 15″ original prints are now part of the UWGB Printmaking Collection.

“Exquisite corpse” is an early 20th century parlor game by which images are collectively created with each artist knowing only his or her part and where to meet up with the other parts.

UWGB artists who participated in the event were current students Brian Galloway and Natalie Vann, and former UWGB students Billy Wenner, Gena Selby, Donna Bensen, Philip Enderby, Brandon Langer, Nadia Juhnke and Chad Peters. UWGB alumni and art instructors Johanna Winters, Danica Oudeans and Don Kroumpos, and UWGB Arts Management graduate Anne Soderlund, an intern at The Hardy Gallery, also worked with the group.


Photos contributed by Dennis Connolly and Scott Roberts

(Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.)


Reception honors student artist Adam Fulwiler

UW-Green Bay student artist Adam Fulwiler was honored for his work, “Windows” a layered, large-scale acrylic painting chosen for display as the Chancellor’s Holiday Art Scholarship selection for 2015-16. Fulwiler was joined by art faculty and others at a reception hosted by Chancellor Gary L. and Georgia Nix Miller, Sept. 24.

Fulwiler, a graduate of West De Pere High School, has a double major in Art and Design Arts and expects to graduate in spring 2017. His painting was selected by Chancellor and Mrs. Miller from a range of student pieces submitted for juried consideration. Fulwiler will receive a monetary award provided through the Holiday Art Scholarship program established by the Millers.

With its selection, “Windows” will be the featured art on the 2015 year-end holiday cards the Millers and the privately funded UW-Green Bay Foundation Inc. will share with campus and community friends of the University. Additionally, the piece will be publicly displayed for one year in the UW-Green Bay Chancellor’s Office, Suite 810 of the David A. Cofrin Library.

Art Prof. Kristy Deetz says Fulwiler “is a diligent worker who sets a standard of excellence in the quality of the work that he produces and in his commitment to growing as an artist.”

In his artist’s statement accompanying “Windows,” Fulwiler describes how his large-scale paintings explore the elements of form including line, shape, value, color and texture. “I build up surfaces by scraping, layering and dragging paint across the entire canvas with the goal of forming visual passages and ‘doorways’ to spaces that often suggest landscapes,” he writes. He uses five-foot-long squeegees, brooms, metal trowels and oversize brushes to create the paintings.

(Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.)

Photos by Tammy Resulta


Faculty note: Sherman presentation

The work of Heidi Sherman, associate professor of Humanistic Studies, and Alison Gates, associate professor of Art, was the topic of roundtable discussion at the annual meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists held at the University of Glasgow, Scotland on Sept. 4. The session was titled “Integrating Textile Studies into the Mainstream Archaeology/Anthropology Curriculum.” Sherman, who attended the meeting, presented “The Flax Project at UW-Green Bay: Engaging Undergraduate Humanities and Art Students with Archaeological Textiles and Ancient Fibers.”