UW-Green Bay Professor Emeritus Hallet J. ‘Bud’ Harris honored by Wisconsin Academy

The Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters announced on Jan. 14, 2020, the seven recipients of the 2020 Academy Fellows Award. Among them was UW-Green Bay Prof. Emeritus Hallet J. ‘Bud’ Harris (NAS), who has dedicated his career and life’s work to scientific solutions to Great Lakes issues.

“His research and advocacy laid the foundation for ecological restoration efforts that are among the most ambitious in the world,” according to his nominators. “His contributions to science and the people of Wisconsin hardly stopped in 1999, however. To this day, he is an effective leader in efforts to improve environmental quality and sustainable resource use in Wisconsin. His contributions range from front-line leadership in water quality issues to meaningful influence on discussions of climate change, environmental economics, and science education. His career as a scientist and leader is approaching 50 years, with no sign of retreat.”

Hallet 'Bud' Harris
Hallet ‘Bud’ Harris

Noteworthy is Harris’s significant publication record, but his major contributions to water science, according to colleagues, are manifest through well-documented influence on public policy. Outcomes of his work, chronicled prominently by reports, research documents, and on-the-ground actions, have led to precedent-setting investments in water quality abatements totaling more than a billion dollars and counting.

At UW-Green Bay, Harris taught undergraduate ecology and graduate courses in wetland ecology and ecosystem management. He and his students carried out research in coastal wetlands of Green Bay as part of the Wisconsin Sea Grant Green Bay Subprogram which he coordinated for eight years. Subsequently he served as “on site coordinator” of the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) PCB Mass Balance Study. In that role, Harris laid the foundation for a PCB cleanup effort in the Fox River—said to be the largest fresh water clean-up in the world—resulting in the removal of 2.4 million tons of contaminated sediments. Harris also led consequential efforts to address nonpoint source pollution of sediments and nutrients, a second complex problem in the Fox River/Lower Green Bay ecosystem.

Serving on all three steering committees (Technical, Ad-hoc Science, and Outreach), he was instrumental in precipitating USEPA and Wisconsin DNR actions to develop total maximum daily load (TMDL) regulations for controlling runoff of phosphorous and suspended solids in the Lower Fox River Basin. During this process, he also obtained nearly $1 million in funding to engage high school students and teachers in a successful stream monitoring and education program in the Fox River Watershed. Among many other professional contributions, he currently serves as member and past chair for the Sea Grant Advisory Council, he is a member of the Science Advisory Board of the Wisconsin Initiative for Climate Change Impacts (WICCI), and he is a long-serving leader of the Fox-Wolf Watershed Alliance Advisory Board.

“The list of Dr. Harris’s leadership roles is truly remarkable, reflecting a passion for applying science to critical ecological and sociological challenges,” say his nominators. “He has contributed significantly to the peer-reviewed scientific literature and he has inspired and mentored hundreds of students. His most important legacy, however, will likely be the public policies and conservation actions that have happened because of his passionate commitment as an applied scientist and community leader.”

After receiving a bachelor of science from Coe College, he graduated with a master’s and Ph.D. from Iowa State University and joined UW–Green Bay in 1969, retiring in 1999. Harris presently serves in a science advisory capacity for four environmental organizations.

UW-Green Bay sponsors Brown County Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Celebration

As it has for years, UW-Green Bay is set to play a fundamental role in Saturday’s (Jan. 18, 2020) Brown County Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Celebration at Northeast Wisconsin Technical College (NWTC). See photos from last year. The University is a major sponsor for this highly-regarded annual event, which runs from 10:30 a.m. to noon at NWTC’s Student Center. Interim Chancellor Cheryl Van Gruensven will present prizes for grades K-3 in the annual MLK poster, poetry and essay contest. A keynote speaker (Dr. Eddie Moore, Jr.), local DJ, t-shirts, cereal drive, photo booth and community service projects will make the 25th annual Brown County MLK Celebration one to remember! A delicious luncheon is served at the program’s end. The event is free and open to the public.

More details are available at: http://browncomlk.org/index.html. Several UW-Green Bay faculty and staff members serve on the MLK event planning committee, including Associate Profs. Jolanda Sallmann and Francis Akakpo (Social Work), Prof. Gaurav Bansal (Business Administration) and Associate Prof. Mussie Teclezion (Business Administration) and Diversity Director Mai Lo Lee (Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs). For more information, please contact Prof. Sallmann (sallmanj@uwgb.edu).

Big weekend coming up for GB Phoenix

There is plenty of opportunity to watch Green Bay basketball in action this Hall-of-Fame Weekend. Men’s basketball will host Oakland on Thursday, Jan. 16, 2020 at 7 p.m. at the Resch Center and Detroit Mercy, Saturday, Jan. 18 at Noon at the Resch. The Phoenix women host IUPUI at 7 p.m. Friday and UIC, Sunday at 1 p.m. for Alumni Day. Both of those games are at the Kress Center. See more at greenbayphoenix.com. Green Bay Athletics is set to induct seven former Phoenix greats to the Athletics Hall of Fame on January 18, 2020. This will be the 21st induction class in the Hall of Fame’s history. The announced 2020 class includes women’s soccer player Lisa Boeser ’96, softball player Katie Stauber (Cooney) ’10, men’s swimmer Zach Hansen ’04, former athletics administrator Marilyn McCarey, men’s Nordic skier Santiago Ocariz ’10, men’s soccer player Joshua Okoampa ’06 and women’s basketball standout Julie Wojta ’12. These seven inductees will be recognized for their athletics achievements, contributions and accomplishments during their successful time at Green Bay. More here. Your final chance to see the Swimming and Diving teams in action at home is this weekend with a Saturday, Jan. 18 meet at 1 p.m.

GB student athletes have 40th straight semester above a 3.0

UW-Green Bay student-athletes combined to achieve a department-wide grade point average of 3.35 in the fall of 2019, marking the 40th-consecutive semester above a 3.0 GPA. For the fall semester of 2019, 15 of the 16 sport programs at Green Bay achieved a semester grade point average of 3.0 or higher, while 12 of the 15 achieved higher than a 3.32.  Additionally, five of the 15 achieved higher than a 3.5 GPA. The mark of 3.35 extends Green Bay’s streak of semesters above a 3.3 GPA to 10 straight. The department was led by women’s golf with a 3.89 grade point average. In addition, women’s Nordic ski (3.81), volleyball (3.68), women’s basketball (3.66) and men’s swimming and diving (3.55) all posted GPAs above a 3.50.

A total of 174 student-athletes posted a 3.0 grade point average or higher, which accounted for more than 76 percent of all student-athletes. Forty student-athletes achieved a 4.0 GPA.

The percentage of student-athletes that received academic honors for the fall semester of 2019 (3.5 or higher) registered just over 53 percent, with a total of 121 student-athletes recognized for achieving Honors (3.5-3.749), High Honors (3.75-3.99) or the Highest Honors (4.0).

Reminder: SIS upgrade Jan. 17-Jan. 21, 2020

An upgrade to UW-Green Bay’s Student Information System (SIS) is planned for Jan. 17, 2020 starting at 4 p.m. until Tuesday morning, Jan. 21, 2020. SIS will be unavailable during this time. Other applications that interface with SIS will still be available during this time. After the upgrade, browser shortcuts will need to be updated to this link. Please contact Michael Bubolz (bubolzm@uwgb.edu) in the IT Division if you have any questions or concerns.

UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus hosts 2020 Career Expo for local high school students

The UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus hosted its 2020 Career Expo on Jan. 8 for local high school students. Four hundred students were in attendance; 350 were freshmen from Manitowoc Lincoln High School and 50 were sophomores from Reedsville High School.

Faculty and staff led career-focused learning sessions. The Expo gave students the opportunity to learn about STEM opportunities and how to use high school classes and extracurricular experiences to prepare for college.

Associate Profs. Amy Kabrhel and James Kabrhel (chemistry) participated in a Cool Chemistry show. Prof. Rick Hein (biology) held a session on blood testing, and Associate Prof. Becky Abler (Biology) discussed bacteria. Lecturer Brian McLean and Assistant Prof. Bill Dirienzo (Physics) talked to the students about the fascinating study of physics, and Admissions Counselor Jennie Strohm held a session titled “High School Matters: Choosing Courses Wisely.” See below for photos of the event.

Reminder: Don’t miss some of the professional development opportunities of 2020

There are still opportunities to sign up for some of the safety trainings being offered by members of the University Staff Professional Development Committee and the Academic Staff Professional Development Program Committee in partnership with University Police! This series of training sessions are different than “Dealing with Disruptions” offered in the past, and have been tailored to meet the needs of UW–Green Bay staff. The workshops are standalone, but are designed to be utilized together. Although sessions for “Self Defense: Protecting Yourself In A Crisis Situation” have concluded, there are still opportunities to participate in “Active Shooter” and “Crisis First Aid” training. Information on these sessions is below:

Active Shooter: Run, Hide, Fight
When seconds count, the police are minutes away. This 90-minute workshop is designed to give the campus community member essential skills to survive until help arrives.

Jan. 15, 2020; 1 to 2:30 p.m.

Location: IS 1034, Green Bay Campus.

Crisis First Aid…What To Do Before Help Arrives
This 90-minute workshop will prepare the employee to provide “self-aid” and “basic lifesaving first aid” to others during a dynamic situation (mass casualty, plane crash, active shooter, etc.). This session is intended to inform the participant on basic treatments of traumatic trauma injuries.

Jan. 21, 2020; 10 to 11:30 a.m.

Location: Christie Theatre, Green Bay Campus.

All Academic and University Staff are encouraged to attend.  There is no fee.

Registration – Active Shooter: Run, Hide, Fight
Registration – Crisis First Aid…What To Do Before Help Arrives

UW-Green Bay faculty to speak at Door County Talks

UW-Green Bay faculty are scheduled to give presentations at the 2020 Door County Talks winter series. Presenters include Associate Prof. Alise Coen (Political Science), Associate Prof. of History and Director of Student Success Vince Lowery, Associate Prof. Kimberley Reilly (Democracy and Justice Studies) and Assistant Prof. Nolan Bennett (Political Science). Below is a description of the presentations.

Immigration Politics: Between Rights and Restrictions with Associate Prof. Alise Coen (Saturday, Jan, 18, 2020 at 10 a.m.)

Debates over U.S. immigration policy have been shaped by a complex history characterized by tensions between migration restrictions and migrant rights. To understand ongoing policy shifts regarding immigration and asylum, it is important to engage with the evolution of both nativism and human rights advocacy. International law and evolving court interpretations have also played a crucial role in immigration politics, exemplified by recent discussions about the Flores Settlement Agreement and zero tolerance policies designed to deter undocumented migrants and asylum-seekers. Coen’s presentation aims to weave together these diverse and sometimes paradoxical historical forces to help shed light on current political realities.

How Many Reconstructions Does It Take to Be Free? A Meditation on the Long Civil Rights Movement with Associate Prof. and UWGB Director of Student Success Vince Lowery (Saturday, Feb. 8, 2020 at 10 a.m.)

With the abolition of slavery, the United States entered the period of Reconstruction, which historian Eric Foner calls “the unfinished revolution.” The meaning of freedom for African-Americans, and in fact all Americans, remained in question. That “revolution” began again in the mid-twentieth century with the civil rights movement, which some historians refer to as the “Second Reconstruction.” Now fifty years removed from that event, in light of the persistence of Jim Crow-style policies and practices, many are calling for a “Third Reconstruction.” In his talk, Lowery will trace the threads connecting these three eras, exploring moments of progress and regression and the road left to travel.

Woman Suffrage 100 Years Later: Assessing Its Triumphs and Limits with Associate Prof. Kimberley Reilly (Saturday, Feb. 22, 2020 at 10 a.m.)

How did the women’s rights movement win passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, and what lesson can we learn from that victory? One hundred years after women won the constitutional right to vote, we will examine the history of the suffrage movement alongside battles that were left unfinished. We will also consider how the legacy of the suffrage movement influences the fight for gender equality today.

The Radical Vision of the American Abolitionists with Assistant Prof. Nolan Bennett (Saturday, Feb. 29, 2020 at 10 a.m.)

Speaking at a Fourth of July celebration in 1860, the formerly enslaved Frederick Douglass famously asked his audience: “Why am I called upon to speak here today? What have I, or those I represent, to do with your national independence?” With this fierce denunciation of American hypocrisy—that the country would celebrate liberty and equality while so many remained enslaved in the South—Douglass offered a radical vision of American history and democracy. In this talk, we will look at how those opposed to slavery (like Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, David Walker and Abraham Lincoln) offered a new, expansive reading of American ideals as they challenged the “peculiar institution.” We will consider how they looked back to the founding era and its documents and forward to a new dawn of justice. In light of that progressive outlook, we wi;; also discuss the lasting legacy of the abolitionists and how slavery continues to influence American politics and ideas.

No RSVP is required for the Door County Talks series. Freewill donations will be encouraged at the door. Coffee and bakery from Kick Ash Coffee will be available for purchase for DC Talks and Coffeehouses.

Prof. Gaurav Bansal to introduce Green Bay Film Society screening

The Green Bay Film Society kicks off its 2020 season with a screening of the 2016 Indian film “Hotel Salvation” at the Neville Public Museum on Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2020 at 7 p.m. Prof. Gaurav Bansal (UW-Green Bay, Business) will introduce the film. The film follows Rajiv, an overworked businessman, who agrees to honor the final wish of his father, Daya, by accompanying him to the holy city of Varanasi. There, they check in to the Hotel Salvation, where residents are given just two weeks to live out their final days or return home. Daya revels in the simple pleasures of this timeless place, but Rajiv is burdened by the obligations he left behind. Eventually, both learn to appreciate each other and the world around them.

The event is co-sponsored by the Humanities Department, the Brown County Library and the Neville Public Museum.