Category: Media Coverage

UWGB in the news, UW-Green Bay on other media sites

Already moving: ‘Joseph,’ Celtic Women, Beatles, Steamroller, ‘Whose Lives?’

The Green Bay Press-Gazette reports that with general ticket sales starting Friday for the upcoming Weidner season, already some early favorites have emerged based on the season subscription sales that started in June. “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” and Celtic Woman in October, Mannheim Steamroller’s holiday show on Nov. 28 are all selling well, as are “RAIN — A Tribute to The Beatles and “Whose Live Anyway?,” an improv comedy show.

Inside Higher Ed article on talk of tech school, UW Colleges merger

“As a legislative committee considers possibly merging the state’s two separate two-year systems, some politicians are questioning whether a more traditional community college model would work better for the state.” That’s the lead in an Insider Higher Ed article about the possibility of an eventual merger of some sort of the 13 two-year UW System Colleges and the various Wisconsin Technical College System institutions.

In the news: Henniges talks to WBAY-TV 2 about grant 


“One of our (objectives) is to promote healthy relationships,” Amy Henniges told WBAY-TV 2 reporter Ellery McCardle about a $127,786 Aurora Health grant to UW-Green Bay. “One of the big things that our campus has never had before is a health educator, so we’re going to use a good part of that money to hire a health educator for the next couple of years to help us with our sexual assault awareness and prevention effort and increase our services to students who have been affected by sexual assault or sexual violence.” For the full story.

Columnist has idea for UW System reorganization


With UWGB’s 50th anniversary approaching, we are reminded that in its earliest days, for a half-dozen years before merger in 1974 or so, UW-Green Bay had administrative responsibility for the two-year campuses in Manitowoc, Menasha and Marinette. Conservative columnist John Torinus thinks the time is right (in the face of harsh budget slashing) for the UW to move on its own, regional reorganization. Food for thought.

Always Climb Higher author Pagels ’87 featured in P-G 


In the most recent edition of our Inside UW-Green Bay print magazine, we highlighted alumnus Jeff Pagels’ success as an inspirational author, speaker, Olympic-caliber athlete, natural-resource manager for the DNR and all-around good guy. Pagels has used a wheelchair since 1984. His 2014 book about his comeback from severe spinal cord injury, Always Climb Higher, is the topic of a recent Green Bay Press-Gazette article.

Former Chronicle editor forecasts higher-ed consolidation

Jeffrey Selingo sees a big shakeout coming for American higher education, eventually, especially for struggling “bottom feeder” institutions. The former Chronicle of Higher Education editor notes that the U.S. system is still admired around the world, but… “Any time I drive in the Northeast, I’m always struck by the number of signs along the highway for a nearby college,” he writes, “…but we don’t need a college at every exit along the highway anymore.” Interesting opinions.

Angry over budget/ tenure, prominent UW prof rips Hitl…uh… Walker

Sarah Goldrick-Rab, a UW-Madison professor of educational policy studies and sociology, a nationally prominent researcher regarding college affordability and access, and an outspoken public intellectual, is again drawing national attention. So far this month she has tweeted comparisons between Scott Walker and Adolph Hitler, and she also warned some incoming UW-Madison freshmen that the school they’ve chosen is a sinking ship. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel quotes UW-Madison Chancellor Rebecca Blank as commenting on the issue: “Any institution has its critics,” and “…especially in social media, it’s important to remember that the loudest voice usually isn’t the most accurate.”

Cut of $2.8m will result in 24 positions lost

In an email Friday (July 10) to all employees, Chancellor Gary L. Miller outlined how the new UW System budget — which includes a loss of $125 million annually in state taxpayer support — will affect UW-Green Bay. The good news: The $2.8 million funding cut here was scaled back from the $4.6 million initially projected, and is unlikely to require involuntary layoffs. The bad news: a significant reduction in force through the loss of several dozen vacant faculty and staff positions will be a challenge. The Chancellor thanked the University’s Trustees for their advocacy, and campus leadership and the University Planning and Innovation Council (UPIC) for their contributions to budget-reduction planning (which continues). To see Miller’s memo, click here.

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About 24 positions at UW-Green Bay are losing their state GPR funding, the Green Bay Press-Gazette reported in its July 11 print edition. “It is a serious reduction,” said Chancellor Gary Miller, who said layoffs aren’t needed because senior employees (29 total) accepted voluntary separation deals. “That’s a significant reduction in our workforce,” Miller said. “We are losing some key people, and some key knowledge.” The university has some savings to use while it fine-tunes its staffing plans, having frozen hiring, curtailed travel and cut back on purchases months ago in anticipation of the state budget reductions being approved. To read the P-G story, click here.

 

 

Regent budget accounts for impacts of $250 million, two-year cut

The UW System Board of Regents approved a 2015-16 budget Thursday that factors in $125 million in “painful” annual cuts from the Governor and Legislature. Several Regents and UW System officials were vocal in reacting to the actions necessitated by GPR reduction in state funding. The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, reports that Regent Charles Pruitt voted against the budget, the first time in his 12 years on the board, which he called “a symbolic vote.” Said Pruitt, “Now for two budgets in a row, there’s been a toxic blend of deep budget cuts and a tuition freeze. The short- and long-term consequences of this budget are profound.” For the J-S coverage, click here.