Author Archives: Guest

Effective communication, influence without authority featured in December SBDC workshops

The Wisconsin Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is offering workshops in December for small business owners, executive team members, and supervisors in any organization.

“Effective Communication” on Tuesday and Wednesday, December 1 and 2, is instructed by entrepreneur, speaker, and communication expert Terra Fletcher. In this two-day workshop participants will learn how nonverbal communication and understanding impacts their effectiveness. Fundamentals of communication, persuasiveness, and constructive feedback techniques will also be covered.

“Lead (Influence) without Authority” on Tuesday, December 8, will teach participants that you do not need a title to have effective influence up, down, and across their organizations. Specifically, styles of influence, default responses, and difficult conversations will be covered. Jamie Schramm, MBA, an employee development coach in several different industries, will facilitate the workshop.

Both workshops earn credit toward a certificate in Supervisory Leadership.

Workshops start at 8:30 a.m. and end at 3:30 p.m. at the Advance Business & Manufacturing Center at 2701 Larsen Road in Green Bay and include lunch and morning and afternoon refreshments. For more information, a downloadable brochure, registration deadlines and fees, and to register for the SBDC’s workforce development workshops and certificate programs, such as supervisory leadership and project management, go to SBDC “Upcoming Programs.” You can also email or call (920) 496-2117.

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Joyous reunion: BlueWhale Coffeehouse returning to UWGB

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If ever a joyous reunion can be
Let us share what we’ve gained and lost in between
We’ll find that the years, both kindly and cruel
Have failed to put distance between you and me

-Claudia Schmidt

And a joyous reunion it will be on Friday, October 16, 2015, when the friends of the former BlueWhale Coffeehouse gather at the Shorewood Golf Course Clubhouse for the return of Claudia Schmidt, Mark Dvorak, Skip Jones and Randal Harris. The event is in celebration of both Alumni Days and UW-Green Bay’s 50th anniversary celebration.

While the reunion cannot take place in the original Shorewood Club building that housed the BlueWhale Coffeehouse (it was torn down years ago), the concert will take place nearby in what was formerly the Shorewood Annex, directly across the sidewalk from where the former Shorewood Club stood.

And while there won’t be the knotty pine paneling, large stone fireplace, well-worn couches or frost-covered windows that gave the coffeehouse its unique ambiance, the original BlueWhale sign (painted by Mike Tincher and Teresa Bargielski in the late 1970’s) will grace the stage. It was rescued from a dumpster after the Club was torn down, and has been hanging in a barn in Bowler, Wis. for the last 35 years.

The showcase artist of the evening will be Schmidt, one of the premiere performers from the BlueWhale days, now an international performer known for her lively folk, jazz and blues and playful humor.

Schmidt, a student at UWGB for a time, played her 12-string guitar and dulcimer to standing-room-only crowds for many years, and went on to a remarkable career traveling the world as a folk singer and spoken word performer. The master of ceremonies for the evening will be folk singer Jones, a UWGB alumnus and BlueWhale regular. He will be joined by Harrison, a remarkable jazz violinist from Madison and Dvorak, a member of the faculty at the Old Town School of Folk Music in Chicago and popular guitar and banjo player who has toured throughout the Midwest and East Coast.

Many alumni have fond memories of Saturday evenings at the BlueWhale — in the 70s and early 80s considered one of the premiere folk music venues in the upper Midwest. Artists from all over the country would come through on tour, playing at Café Extempore in Minneapolis, then at the BlueWhale in Green Bay, and then on to venues in Madison or Chicago.

Some of those acts became folk music icons (Utah Phillips, Bill Staines, Gordon Bok and John McCutcheon all played at the Whale) and many others achieved regional and national acclaim (Greg Brown, Paul Cebar and Jones, among them).

It wasn’t just the music that drew students and community members to the BlueWhale, however. There was something magical about the place in its heyday — the music, the fireplace and the fellowship all flowed together to create a warm and friendly gathering place for a particular crowd of people who shared some common values and interests — the environment, folk music, art and social justice.

As that crowd reunites on Friday October 16, perhaps a few pounds heavier and with a little more gray, maybe a little of that magic can be recreated.

Doors open at 6:15 p.m. for socializing and reminiscing. The public is asked to bring memorabilia from the BlueWhale days (posters, programs, handbills, photos, etc) to share, and perhaps contribute to the UWGB archives. The concert begins at 7:00 p.m. Price of admission is $15 (cash or check only—no credit cards), or free to those purchasing an Alumni Days admissions bracelet (entrance for two for $25) for all Alumni Days activities.

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Feature written by Mike Stearney, a former BlueWhale patron and former UWGB Dean of Enrollment Services

Emotional intelligence, financials featured in October SBDC workshops

The Wisconsin Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is offering one-day workshops in late October for small business owners as well as executives team members and their direct reports with hiring and P&L responsibility.

“Leading with Emotional Intelligence” is Wednesday, October 14 workshop featuring instructor Susan Dutton. Emotional Intelligence (“EQ”) is considered a key competitive advantage within the workforce. Participants will complete their own online EQ assessment and learn how to coach EQ in others.

“Financial Management for Nonfinancial Managers” on Tuesday, October 20, features instructor Greg Gauthier, with senior management and small business ownership experience. Participants will learn how to read major financial statements as tools to diagnose an organization’s health and will understand cash vs. profits, cash flow, cash budgeting, breakeven analysis.

Both workshops earn credit toward a certificate in Supervisory Leadership.
Workshops start at 8:30 a.m. and end at 3:30 p.m. at the Advance Business & Manufacturing Center at 2701 Larsen Road in Green Bay and include lunch and morning and afternoon refreshments. For more information such as registration deadlines and fees, and to register for the SBDC’s workforce development and certificate programs, such as supervisory leadership and project management, go to SBDC “Upcoming Programs.” You can also email or call (920) 496-2117.

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Choose your own instructor in SBDC’s Certificate in Project Management Program

The Wisconsin Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is reintroducing their Project Management certificate program using “extra blended” learning. The program is available now and allows students to choose their instructor.

According to Director of the Certificate in Project Management Program Kay Wais, PMP, MPM, “This program is ‘extra blended’ because it offers much greater flexibility and additional technologies compared to other blended learning courses. This includes the optional use of webcams and screen sharing technologies to both help in the student sessions, so students gain experience managing virtual teams with the real-time communication technology project managers often use today.”

The Certificate in Project Management Program has flexible content options for learning the fundamentals, for preparing for the PMP® (Project Management Professional) exam, and for project management specialty areas and industries. Students have the option to work with their instructor, chosen by them, to help build their personal project portfolio to demonstrate professional project plans, including in interview situations. Students work at their own pace and the Certificate is earned after holding six sessions with their instructor and completing 56 learning hours of activities.

To register or obtain additional information on the Certificate in Project Management program, visit the SBDC website “Upcoming Programs” or contact (920) 496-2117 or email.

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In literary fashion, Sheepshead students dress up to address the competition

Above: Poetry staffers dressed up as literary journals: (from l-r) Verse Wisconsin, Poetry Magazine, Atticus Review, and The Paris Review.

“Excuse me, are you The Paris Review?” asks a poet hoping to publish her work.

“Yes, but you’ll have to work harder to get to know me. I’m historic and impressive,” replies The Paris Review, dressed in a suit, tie, and hat.

“Hey! Hey! Come submit to me!” shouts the neon-sweatered poetry journal Verse Wisconsin. “I’ll find a place for you!”

As part of an assignment in Associate Prof. Rebecca Meacham’s English 324: Practicum in Literary Publishing course, students recently presented their findings on “the competition” — arts journals of national repute. At the same time, staffers also produce an issue of UWGB’s journal of the arts, Sheepshead Review. Every semester, students delve into Meacham’s assignment, “The Aesthetic Project,” to evaluate how arts journals attract contributors, promote events, connect with artists, and sell issues.

“Many students have never even seen a journal before they do this project,” Meacham says. “Once they interact with other magazines, they turn a critical eye on Sheepshead Review, deciding what we could do, what we should do — and what we definitely should not do.”

Over the years, “The Aesthetic Project” assignment has spurred editors to develop Sheepshead Review into a full-color, 160-page magazine featuring dynamic design elements, interviews, and occasional special sections. Since its founding in the 1970s, the journal has won the prestigious ADDY award for design, garnered praise in New Pages review of literary magazines, and attracted contributors from Israel, New Zealand, and all over the U.S.

Every aspect of the journal and the “Practicum” course is student-directed — and intended to build professional skills.

For the Fall 2013 “Aesthetic Project,” students will conduct a semester-long assessment of other journals, following Twitter accounts, Facebook pages, websites, and blogs, as well as reading print and electronic copies of issues.

Already, staffers have proposed redesigns of Sheepshead Review’s website.

Current Editor in Chief Beth Heidtke is thrilled by the enthusiasm, as is Meacham.

“Every semester, students are invigorated by this project. Our layout editor wants to change the journal’s paper and size,” Meacham says. “And we now have a team of Social Media editors on Twitter and Facebook, who are planning a Sheepshead Tumblr and blog.”

In fact, the power of first impressions — and networking — became clear when a student group chose to dress up as their assigned journals — and Meacham tweeted the picture to the journals’ editors.

“What a fun idea! We’re guessing Atticus is represented by the second lady from the right?” tweeted @Atticus Books.

“We’re definitely the hat/tie wearing individual on the right!” replied @Paris Review.

Story and photo submitted by Associate Professor Rebecca Meacham.

Students get a taste and feel of everyday life in the pre-modern world

UW-Green Bay students in Associate Professor Heidi Sherman’s (Humanistic Studies-Medieval History) History Capstone Course had a chance to relive the past with a visit to a longhouse recreated to replicate those of tenth-century Scandinavian farms in Norway.

Owen and Elspeth Christianson, who have studied Viking-age Norway for nearly 40 years, built the longhouse in 2011-2012 near Marshfield, Wis.

Students camped overnight and some slept in the longhouse, others in tents. They enjoyed an evening campfire and a pre-modern tradition — storytelling. Owen shared tales of the Vinland Sagas, which describe the Viking voyages to Labrador, Canada in the early 11th century.

The students studied two specific areas of Viking history, clothing in Viking-age Greenland and woodworking.

Hands-on opportunities included medieval weaving, including metal weaving, and blacksmithing — creating their own s-hooks used for hanging pots over the fire. Some students spread daub (a mixture of clay, sand and straw) over the walls of the Viking-era latrine. They also prepared all of the food: apple-onion-bacon stew, porridge and flat bread (recipes from the Viking Age with ingredients available to medieval Scandinavians).

“The teamwork, mixed with the learning of the Viking culture, gave me an awesome positive feeling I’ve rarely felt on these things,” said student Kelsey Schulz. “Instead of a classic lecture students were able to have a first hand experience about the everyday life in the pre-modern world.”

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Photos by Kimberly Vlies, graphic and web designer, Marketing and University Communication
Story by Chanel Aries, intern, Marketing and University Communication

UWGB education brings Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary employees full circle

Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary employees Ben Nelson and Matt Rupnik have something in common beside their current place of employment. Both are also University of Wisconsin-Green Bay alumni.

No surprise. The neighboring entities — the Sanctuary is just minutes from campus — have a long and continuing partnership that includes numerous UW-Green Bay Biology and Environmental Science students serving as interns and volunteers at the Sanctuary through the years.

Nelson, a 2003 double major in Biology and Environmental Science, is now assistant director for the Wildlife Sanctuary. He returned to Green Bay after serving as a wildlife biologist for the USDA Wildlife Services in the greater Chicago area. The relatively young alumnus has worked as a natural resource scientist, a wildlife biologist and the branch manager of a wildlife management consulting firm.

“I certainly believe my education at UW-Green Bay has helped me in my role at the Wildlife Sanctuary as well as throughout my entire professional career,” he said.

Nelson said one course at UW-Green Bay, taught by Prof. Robert Howe, was particularly influential in helping him decide on a post-college career. In that course, Howe was approached for advice from an organization in regard to how to sustainably manage a property. Each student in the course looked at a different aspect of environmental/natural resource management and created a specific management plan that covered their topic.

“I selected white-tailed deer management for my project,” Nelson said, “and have been actively involved in white-tailed deer management in many different capacities ever since that course, including here at the Wildlife Sanctuary.”

Nelson wasn’t brand new to Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary in August 2012. His connection started during his undergraduate career at UW-Green Bay when he arranged an independent study assisting a UW-Green Bay graduate student with research on Canada geese at the sanctuary.

Nelson said he coordinated the study through the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity and Dr. Howe. “Now, as assistant director for Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary,” Nelson said, “I serve as the staff adviser to the sanctuary’s director on resource issues and activities related to fish and wildlife.”

His other responsibilities vary, but include anything from recommending policy, guidance and plans to serving as a liaison with state, national and international organizations in the fish and wildlife community.

Like Nelson, Rupnik, who is at present a senior animal keeper, also started with the sanctuary as a current student. The 2007 Biology grad held a work-study position there during spring semester junior year and all of senior year of college. He also worked as a temporary seasonal maintenance employee one summer and as a rehabilitation intern the next. Post-graduation, he worked at a private wildlife sanctuary in Texas for four years, as an animal care intern and an animal keeper before returning to the Wildlife Sanctuary.

He now works under the direction of the curator by assisting in the care of animals in the Wildlife Sanctuary’s permanent collection, as well as caring for injured or orphaned wildlife that come in as part of the facility’s rehab program. He also helps supervise part-time keepers, interns, work-study keepers and volunteers, making certain that they are “providing the proper care for each animal and following correct husbandry procedures.”

“I will help clean cages, prepare and distribute animal diets, calculate medicine dosages to administer to patients as directed by the curator or vet, record observations of animal behavior, handle or restrain animals, perform basic maintenance on animal enclosures and provide informal or formal presentations to the public either in person or over the phone,” he explained.

Rupnik said his classes at UW-Green Bay helped him develop skills he regularly uses on the job.

“My anatomy, mammalogy, environmental science and many of the lab exercises provided me with the skills, knowledge and thought processes necessary for what I do on a daily basis,” he said.

He added that much of what he learned was thanks to the work-study program, internships and his volunteer work.

In spring, a number of UW-Green Bay students worked at the sanctuary, including Zachary McLees, a Biology major and a work-study keeper; Haley Sharpe, a Biology major and rehab intern, who finds that her ornithology class at UWGB helps her work with the many birds that are brought to the sanctuary; intern Rachel Schiller, a Biology major who graduated this May; and Emily Ruff, a recent graduate who was also a regular volunteer.

“We have a great relationship with the Wildlife Sanctuary,” Prof. Howe said, “largely because of connections with the former director, Ty Bauman, and current director, Mike Reed. Both have been extremely supportive of our students.”
Story by Michael Duenkel
Photos by Veronica Wierer

Perspectives: Glasses research confirms stereotypes

UW-Green Bay senior Miranda DeMars hesitated between the decision to wear glasses or contact lenses for a job interview. That hesitation became the impetus for research she will present at the Midwestern Psychological Association convention in Chicago, Thursday, May 2.

The Peshtigo native will be presenting “First Impressions: Do Glasses Matter?” centered on the idea that people are judged in regards to intelligence and other characteristics based upon wearing glasses.

DeMars and her team members, junior Amanda Novak and senior Amy Vaughn, divided 49 participants into two groups, one with glasses and one without. From there participants responded to whom looked the most intelligent, trustworthy and attractive. Their results showed, in general, people find those who wear glasses to be more trustworthy and intelligent while those who do not wear glasses were found to be more attractive.

“The coolest part about the entire project is that this started with simple curiosity and we watched big ideas, small details, and hard work, turn into physical evidence,” DeMars said.

She believes it is the first time research of this kind, on this subject, has been conducted by college students in the U.S.

DeMars explained that group work is a bit of a challenge for “naturally independent” people such as herself, but that the three researchers complimented each other playing off of each others’ strengths and weaknesses for the best possible outcome. She described the experience as “a huge growth opportunity, especially in regards to leadership skills such as communication and decision making.” She also credited UW-Green Bay Psychology and Human Development Professor Jennifer Lanter as an “incredible asset, support system, and motivator.“

DeMars will graduate in December of 2013 and plans to pursue a master’s degree in higher education administration or college student personnel.

“I want to help facilitate a positive environment for college students to grow personally while achieving their academic goals. That positive environment helped me at UW-Green Bay and I know that the faculty and staff genuinely care about me and my well-being. I want to be able to do the same for others one day,” she said.
Story by Tayler Zajac, editorial intern, Marketing and University Communication.
Photo by Holly Williams, photo intern, Marketing and University Communication.

Adsit gains curator experience as an undergraduate

Victoria Adsit, a UW-Green Bay senior from Whitelaw, Wis., had a chance to live her future last month, when she worked as curator of the “Hmong Art: Changing Traditions” exhibit at the Art Garage, Green Bay.

An art major with an emphasis in museum studies, Adsit said she felt secure in her ability to assemble the exhibit, and says time spent with the University’s collection in the Lawton Gallery contributed greatly to that confidence.

Stephen Perkins, curator of UW-Green Bay’s Lawton Gallery, recommended Adsit for the position.

“I chose Victoria because she is planning a career in art conservation and has been an exceptional student within the museum/gallery studies program,” Perkins said. “She also has the personality to work with different people. It’s an important skill to have when working with many different artists.”

Although Adsit admits she was a little surprised at how difficult it was for her to find artists, she was able to find the silver lining.

“It was the perfect opportunity for me to further expose myself to diversity and make connections with community members,” she said.

Adsit said she is glad her passion could be used positively within the community. The exhibit included traditional Hmong textiles, digital prints and collages, and story clothes, which can depict traditional folk life and even something as complex as the Hmong people fleeing their home country and settling in the United States.

“Museums are one of the best ways to learn about other cultures and beliefs,” says Adsit. “I am glad I could contribute to that.”

Adsit will graduate in the fall of 2013 and plans to pursue a master’s degree in art conservation.

Story by Marketing Intern Tayler Zajac. Photo by University Photographer Eric Miller.