Author Archives: Kelly Moore

UW-Green Bay Music presents Student Honors Recital

UW-Green Bay Music will feature seven student musicians during its Student Honors Recital at 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 14 in Fort Howard Hall at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts. It is free and open to the public.

The concert will begin with Jamie Rodgers, Pulaski, a student of Prof. Cheryl Grosso, performing Nebojša J. Živković’s “Iliaš” on the marimba. James Letellier, Whitewater, baritone, a student of Assistant Prof. Courtney Sherman, will take the stage next, performing Ralph Vaughan Williams’ “Songs of Travel” and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s “An Chloe.” Ryan Dummer, Green Bay, a student of Assistant Prof. Michael Rector, will accompany Letellier before taking his turn to perform. Dummer will play Johannes Brahms’ “Intermezzo in A Minor, Op.118 #1,” “Intermezzo in A Major, Op.118 #2” and “Intermezzo in E Minor, Op.119 #2.”

Student Matt Hillman, Appleton, will perform next, playing “I Hear a Rhapsody” (Jack Baker, George Fragos, Dick Gasparre) and “Something Tells Me” (Jane Herbert Hall) on guitar. Hillman is a student of Associate Prof. Stefan Hall, a Humanistic Studies faculty member and Music adjunct. Hillman will be followed by McKenna VanDerLeest, Green Bay, an alto saxophone student of Associate Prof. John Salerno. She will perform “Piéces caractéristiques en forme de suite” by Pierre Max Dubois. Nicholas Schommer, Jackson, baritone, also a student of Sherman, will then perform Gabriel Fauré’s “Lydia” and Franz Schubert’s “Die Winterreise.” Pianist Nicholas Saldaña, Green Bay, also a student of Rector, will perform last, playing Frederic Chopin’s “Ballade No.2 in F Major, Op. 38.”

This is the 17th event of the 2014-15 season for UW-Green Bay, an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music. For more information, visit www.uwgb.edu/music.

#15-12

‘Well-connected’ Weyenberg tapped as inaugural Cofrin Executive-in-Residence

top-story-WeyenbergA respected business and community leader has become the first-ever Executive-in-Residence for UW-Green Bay’s Austin E. Cofrin School of Business.

Tim Weyenberg, past CEO and current Executive Chair of the Board of Directors for Foth Companies, is in the early stages of his tenure in the newly created role. He is working with University stakeholders to determine how he can be most effective, and will have a more consistent presence on campus — including regular office hours and more — come spring.

Even in its formative stages, Weyenberg’s role — and his leadership — promises to make a difference, said Cofrin School of Business Director Lucy Arendt.

“Tim is especially well-connected, knowledgeable, super energetic,” Arendt said. “He’s got a great reputation in the community as a leader, and also in terms of his connections to the campus. He’s very committed — genuinely interested in strengthening the relationships between the campus and community. So he’s a perfect choice for this.”

Weyenberg spent 28 years with Foth, 16 as CEO, before retiring in March 2013. His extensive community involvement has included leadership roles with the New North, Greater Green Bay Community Foundation and Green Bay Area Chamber of Commerce. He received the 2013 Free Enterprise Award from the Rotary Club of Green Bay. At UW-Green Bay, he has been actively involved with the Business program, the Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI), Phuture Phoenix program and more. This next opportunity, Weyenberg said, is an exciting one.

“When she (Arendt) explained what they were trying to accomplish, with enhancing the connection between the school of business and the business community,” Weyenberg said, “it seemed to me this role provided a huge opportunity to enhance that Cofrin School of Business vision of being knowledge-seekers in Northeastern Wisconsin.

“I think we know there’s a lot going on — but there’s also a lot to do.”

With new UW-Green Bay Chancellor Gary L. Miller stressing attention to innovation, entrepreneurship and partnerships, that work is likely to have high priority. Immediate tasks include establishing a Cofrin School of Business advisory board, a process with which Weyenberg will be deeply involved. He also will advise faculty on curriculum, work one-on-one with students, guest lecture and help with things such as mock interviews. And while Weyenberg definitely has ideas of what his executive residency may look like, he’s reaching out to students, faculty and others to help him further define the role.

“There’s really two themes I have in mind at this point,” Weyenberg said. “One is improving the connectivity between the Cofrin School of Business, between the University and the business community… Another one is relevance … how do we engage that community to make what is being produced by the school of business even more relevant to the potential customer, the employer?”

Made possible with funds from the University’s largest-ever academic gift — $5.5 million from Dr. David A. Cofrin — Weyenberg’s tenure will last one to two years. And while his business acumen is second to none, Arendt said, Weyenberg also will show students how to be a well-rounded and contributing member of a community — a message, she says, that is critical.

“He’s not just somebody who has done well at work,” Arendt says. “Students sometimes, they get a lot of questions about what they’re going to be doing to make a living, and that sort of thing.

“It’s not about what are you doing to make a living, but what are you doing to make a life? And I think he’s a great role model for that.”

For more information on the appointment of Weyenberg as Executive-in-Residence for the Cofrin School of Business.

Foth’s Weyenberg tapped as inaugural Cofrin Executive-in-Residence

A well-respected business and community leader has become the first-ever Executive-in-Residence for UW-Green Bay’s Austin E. Cofrin School of Business.

Tim Weyenberg

Tim Weyenberg

Tim Weyenberg, past CEO and current Executive Chair of the Board of Directors for Foth Companies, is in the early stages of his tenure in the newly created role. He is working with University stakeholders to determine how he can be most effective, and plans to have a more consistent presence on campus — including regular office hours and more — later this semester.

Weyenberg’s role — and his leadership — promises to make a difference, said Cofrin School of Business Director Lucy Arendt.

“Tim is especially well-connected, knowledgeable, super energetic,” Arendt said. “He’s got a great reputation in the community as a leader, and also in terms of his connections to the campus. He’s very committed — genuinely interested in strengthening the relationships between the campus and community. So he’s a perfect choice for this.”

Weyenberg spent 28 years with Foth, 16 as CEO, before retiring in March 2013. His extensive community involvement has included leadership roles with the New North, Greater Green Bay Community Foundation and Green Bay Area Chamber of Commerce. At UW-Green Bay, he has been actively involved with the business program, the Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI), Phuture Phoenix program and more. This current opportunity, Weyenberg said, is an exciting one.

“When (Arendt) explained what they were trying to accomplish, with enhancing the connection between the School of Business and the business community,” Weyenberg said, “it seemed to me this role provided a huge opportunity to enhance that School of Business vision of being knowledge-seekers in Northeastern Wisconsin.

“I think we know there’s a lot going on — but there’s also a lot to do.”

Those tasks include establishing a Cofrin School of Business advisory board, a process with which Weyenberg will be deeply involved. He also will advise faculty on curriculum, work one-on-one with students, guest lecture and help with things like mock interviews.

Made possible with funds from the University’s largest-ever academic gift — $5.5 million from the Cofrin family — Weyenberg’s tenure will last one to two years. And while his business acumen is second to none, Arendt said, Weyenberg also will show students how to be a well-rounded and contributing member of a community — a message, she says, that is critical.

“What a tremendous role model for our students — he’s the whole package,” Arendt said. “He’s not just somebody who has done well at work. Students sometimes, they get a lot of questions about, what are they going to be doing to make a living, and that sort of thing.

“It’s not about what are you doing to make a living, but what are you doing to make a life? And I think he’s a great role model for that.”

#15-11

UW-Green Bay presents wide array of winter, spring Offerings for Educators

UW-Green Bay Education Outreach is presenting a full lineup of new and returning winter and spring Offerings for Educators, a variety of online and in-person courses designed to help teachers, administrators and other professionals obtain the practical education they need to apply theory and best practice to the classroom and school environment.

Interested educators are encouraged to consider such courses as “Children and Poverty,” an offering that examines the issues of childhood poverty, homelessness and the effects thereof on the brain and learning. Educators will explore strategies for teaching students to be in charge of their own education and learn to develop a plan for addressing issues of poverty in their particular educational setting.

Educators also can choose from a variety of courses that focus on the all-important issue of technology, keeping current on the latest trends for better learning outcomes, classroom management and more. Offerings include “Using Technology to Enhance Student Writing and Comprehension in the Classroom,” an online course geared for educators of grades four through 12. Participants will learn to enhance their classroom assignments by integrating the latest web 2.0 writing tools and providing instruction that fosters 21st century skills in their students. Other technology-related courses include “Using the iPad to Support Teaching, Learning and Management,” and “Using the SMART Board to Support Critical Thinking K-12.”

Detailed course information, including syllabi and cost and registration details, is available online at www.uwgb.edu/educationoutreach. UW-Green Bay courses for educators align with Wisconsin standards for teacher and administrator development and licensure. Contact the Education Outreach Office with questions or for more information, at (800) 621-2313, (920) 465-2480 or educationoutreach@uwgb.edu.

#15-10

Local coverage: Proposed UW System cuts, autonomy

Proposed UW System budget cuts and added autonomy were big news Tuesday (Jan. 27), as word of Gov. Walker’s plan for $300 million in reductions spread statewide and beyond. Closer to home, local news stations explored what the proposal might mean for UW-Green Bay. Chancellor Gary L. Miller spoke with numerous reporters throughout the day, noting that proposed autonomy shouldn’t be viewed as an exchange for budget cuts. “I hope people don’t see it as a trade-off,” he told Fox 11’s Andrew LaCombe. “I think that’s not what happened. The budget cuts are a reflection of the state budget. The autonomy idea is something that the System has talked about for 40 years.” The budget cuts will be difficult for UW-Green Bay, Miller told Local 5. “The budget cut part is disturbing,” he said. “These cuts are very large — they come after six years of budget cutting in state higher education. So we’re concerned.”

A sampling of local coverage is as follows:
WLUK, Fox 11
Local 5
WBAY, Channel 2
Wisconsin Public Radio
WHBY radio

Alumnus Allen, event founder Ives to be featured at Jazz Fest XLV

An accomplished UW-Green Bay alumnus will be the featured guest for Jazz Fest XLV, to be held Saturday, Feb. 7 on campus. Carl Allen is a noted jazz drummer who has performed with the likes of Sammy Davis Jr. and Branford Marsalis. A dedicated educator who has more than 200 recordings to his credit, Allen co-founded Big Apple Productions in 1988 and has produced recordings for notable artists and several Japanese labels. He will be joined during the Jazz Fest public concert — 4 p.m. in the Weidner Center’s Cofrin Family Hall — by a special group of UW-Green Bay all-star jazz alumni, directed by Jazz Fest founder Lovell Ives, as well as the University’s Jazz Ensemble. Six high schools from across Wisconsin will take part in the daylong educational and performance event. Our news release has additional information.

Learning in Retirement featured on Local 5 Live

UW-Green Bay’s Learning in Retirement program got some great airtime Tuesday (Jan. 27) during two morning segments on Local 5 Live. In the first, LIR President Frank Moon was joined by program art teacher Jim Briggs, who talked about and displayed works from his pencil drawing class. Moon was back in the second segment, this time with LIR horticulturists John and Liz Katalinich, who focused on a pruning course set for later this spring. Word has it that the LIR phone was ringing off the hook Tuesday afternoon. You can check out the Local 5 segments, here: segment one / segment two.
 

Nursing’s Herdman to talk healthy living with Good Day Wisconsin

Tune in Friday (Jan. 30) to Fox 11’s Good Day Wisconsin, where Assistant Prof. Heather Herdman, Nursing, will be featured in live segments at 6:15, 7:45 and 8:45 a.m. Herdman will be interviewed on herbs, essential oils and foods to keep one healthy during the winter (evidence-based, of course!). She hopes the segments will generate interest in a course she is teaching on these topics for the nonprofit Bridge-Between Retreat Center in Denmark. That course, titled “Staying Healthy This Winter: Incorporating Aromatherapy and Herbs,” runs from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 7 — more information. Herdman is a Bridge-Between board member.

It’s nearly Friday!

And every Friday is Phoenix Friday. Celebrate the new semester with Phoenix Friday deep discounts at The Phoenix Bookstore. Stay warm the remaining part of winter with 20 percent off all winter hats, scarves, mittens and gloves all day Friday, Jan. 30.  A’viands continues to offer a 10 percent discount on Fridays to anyone wearing Phoenix gear, so put on your new UWGB scarf or hat and take advantage! Keep up the Phoenix pride by cheering on the Green Bay Swimming and Diving team against UW-Milwaukee at the Kress Events Center at 1 p.m. Saturday (Jan. 31). Cheap Seats will also kick off for the semester this weekend, playing “The Best of Me” at 6:30 p.m. and 9:05 p.m. Friday, and throughout the weekend at the Christie Theatre. Go Phoenix.

Food security is topic of semester’s first NAS Seminar

The first Natural and Applied Sciences Seminar for spring semester will take place Friday, Feb. 6 in Environmental Sciences 301. Naresh Rimal of the School of Medical and Applied Sciences at Australia’s Central Queensland University will present “Opportunistic Blending of the Grounded Theory and System Thinking in Food Security Inquiry” at 3 p.m. His talk will be followed by a 4 p.m. social in ES 317. Hope to see you there!