Author Archives: Nancy Matzke

Faculty note: publication by Nursing’s Vandenhouten


The following item from earlier this month was archived to the UWGB news site but might not have made it into the email version of the LOG newsletter distributed to faculty and staff. In case you missed it:
Christine Vandenhouten, associate professor of Nursing, co-authored an article in the September/October 2015 issue of the journal Public Health Nursing about the results of a national study exploring motivators and barriers for obtaining the public health nursing certification. The article, “Credentialing Public Health Nurses: Current Issues and Next Steps Forward,” found that while nursing certification is viewed by many as a means to document specialty knowledge and expertise, few public health nurses hold this credential. The authors found that, among nurses that do, they do it out of a desire to validate professional knowledge and competence with a relative few citing financial incentives as a motivating factor. (Less than 25 percent received any form of compensation for the distinction). The main barriers to certification were being unaware of the eligibility requirements, cost, and the sense that it was not valued/rewarded by their employer. Vandenhouten and her co-authors (colleagues from nursing schools at the University of Maryland and Florida State University) provide recommendations for public health stakeholders including professional organizations, schools of nursing, and policy makers for promoting this important external validation of expertise.

Slideshow: Phuture Phoenix Day I, 2015

Phuture Phoenix Day 2015

The first of two Phuture Phoenix Days this fall brought 950 fifth-graders from across Northeastern Wisconsin to the UW-Green Bay campus on Oct. 13 for a full day of tours, activities and fun. The program builds connections with young students to promote educational attainment and get them thinking about secondary education at a younger age. Student photography interns captured the day in photos.

Photos by Kayla Ermer and Kayla Teske, photo interns, Marketing and University Communications

(Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.)

UW-Green Bay Theatre presents ‘Theophilus North’

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University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Theatre and Dance presents the comedic drama Theophilus North, a Jazz Age tale based on a semi-autobiographical story by Thornton Wilder, as its first production of the 2015-16 season.

The performances of Theophilus North will take place Thursday through Saturday, Oct. 15-17, and Wednesday through Saturday, Oct. 21-24 at 7:30 p.m. each evening in the Jean Weidner Theatre at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts on campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive. General admission prices at the door are $20 for the general public and $17 for seniors and students (discounted to $18 and $15 if purchased in advance). Tickets for currently enrolled UW-Green Bay students are $10.

Set in 1926, the play follows 30-year-old Theophilus North, who quits his teaching position in New Jersey and embarks on a quest for fun, adventure and his place in the world. When his used car breaks down, leaving him stranded in Newport, Rhode Island, Theophilus takes on odd jobs in houses of the wealthy.

The title role in the student production will be played by junior Evan Ash, a double major at UW-Green Bay and the recipient of the Irene A. Shewalter Memorial Scholarship for Theatre.

When asked about the role, Ash said, “I identify most with Theophilus, and I instantly fell in love with the journey he and the rest of the characters take during the show…The part I enjoy most about playing Theophilus is being able to project his aura of kindness and good-hearted nature and his willingness to help anyone.”

Theophilus North is written by Matthew Burnett based upon the semi-autobiographical final work of Wilder, the Pulitzer Prize-winning icon of American literature. The production is directed by Associate Prof. John Mariano.

For more information about this event, call 920-465-2944 or visit the Weidner Center website.

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UW-Green Bay offers fall 2015 courses for educators

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is pleased to announce its autumn course offerings for educators who wish to obtain license renewal, achieve personal or professional developmental goals, or seek salary advancement.

Educators with basic experience using Google tools can further their technology skills through the popular class, “Google Tools: Moving your Skills to the Next Level.” Two new courses in the science area include a new field biology course, “Methods of Field Biology for Educators: Natural History and Biology of Lake Michigan Salmon,” and a course on how to bring archeology into the elementary classroom, “Archeology for the Elementary School.” Also back by popular demand is the course, “Interventions: Evidence-Based Behavioral Strategies for Individual Students,” which is aimed at assisting educators who work with students struggling with chronic misbehavior.

Visit Education Outreach for a more complete list of courses, along with syllabi, enrollment options, and registration information. New offerings are added throughout the year. The website contains the most up-to-date listing. Space is limited and registration is recommended at least three weeks prior to the start of each course. UW-Green Bay courses for educators are aligned with Wisconsin standards for teacher and administrator development and licensure.

Contact the UW-Green Bay Education Outreach Office with questions or further information at (800) 621-2313 or (920) 465-2480 or e-mail.

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New academic year brings new master’s in Data Science

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(Photo above courtesy of UW-Extension)

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay marks the Sept. 2 start of the fall semester and the 2015-16 academic year with the debut of the first online master’s degree in data science ever offered in the UW System.

UW-Green Bay is a partner in the new Master’s of Data Science degree with UW-Extension and five other UW System universities, in Eau Claire, La Crosse, Oshkosh, Stevens Point and Superior. Faculty from each of the participating campuses will teach the online classes.

Officials say the new degree responds to one of America’s fastest growing fields as businesses and organizations seek to harness vast amounts of data — newly available through various technological innovations — to make better, data-driven decisions.

“The exponential growth in data generation, and the need to get hands around this data, has led businesses scrambling for ways to hone their strategies, improve existing processes and bolster innovation in their products and services,” says Gaurav Bansal, associate professor of management, information science and statistics at UW-Green Bay.

Adds Bansal, who will direct the Master’s of Data Science program at UW-Green Bay, “This program harnesses not only the faculty expertise from different UW campuses but also different academic disciplines including Computer Science, Statistics, Information Technology Management, Business Management and Communication. The program has been developed with input from Industry leaders and is closely aligned with the business needs in this area.”

The curriculum will be grounded in computer science, math and statistics, management and communication. Students will learn how to clean, organize, analyze and interpret large and complex data sets using the latest tools and analytical methods. Admission to the program will require a bachelor’s degree and a 3.0 GPA. Aptitude tests such as the GMAT and GRE will not be required.

“Our ability to collect and interpret data is crucial to the success of our business,” says Matt Mueller, senior vice president of finance and chief financial officer for Schreiber Foods of Green Bay, an advocate of the new program. “Decisions that we make — from providing market insights, to developing modern capabilities, to creating efficiencies in our manufacturing environment and everything in between — are data-driven. We employ a number of professionals (in this area), and I see this online master’s degree program in Data Science as another great resource for us.”

Bansal says tuition will compares favorably to competing graduate programs from other institutions. Like other collaborative online University of Wisconsin programs, students will pay the same tuition whether they live in Wisconsin or out-of-state.

The Master of Science in Data Science program is intended for students with a bachelor’s degree in math, statistics, analytics, computer science, or marketing; or three to five years of professional experience as a business intelligence analyst, data analyst, financial analyst, information technology analyst, database administrator, computer programmer, statistician or other related position.

Bansal points also to a report by McKinsey Global Institute that predicts demand for “deep analytical talent” in the United States could be 50 to 60 percent greater than projected supply by 2018. Opportunities have been identified in almost every economic sector: manufacturing, construction, transportation, warehousing, communication, science, health care, computer science, information technology, retail, sales, marketing, finance, insurance, education, government, law enforcement, security and more.

The Master of Science in Data Science joins a growing list of online degree and certificate programs available at UW-Green Bay. Prospective students seeking more information about the Master of Science in Data Science program are encouraged to visit the website, call 1-877-895-3276 or email.

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Trail-rescue trio gets big ovation

life-savers-postFacilities Management employees Nathan Rusch and Lyle Uitenbroek were joined on stage by student worker Samantha Braaten at the University Union’s Phoenix Room during the annual faculty-staff Convocation on Aug. 26.

The three were invited forward by UW-Green Bay Chancellor Gary L. Miller to receive certificates of appreciation for their response to a potentially life-threatening accident earlier this month. They also received a standing ovation.

Braaten and a fourth staff member were on routine duty Aug. 18, clearing storm debris from one of the Arboretum trails. A good-sized tree had fallen, blocking the path and creating a hazard.

The tree shifted, pinning Braaten’s partner. It stretched across his neck and upper body, making it difficult for him to breathe. Braaten reacted immediately and, summoning her strength and using branches as levers, she managed to keep the full weight off of the victim. She also dialed for help.

Rusch and Uitenbroek were first to arrive. They found a chain saw and began cutting away sections while continuing to protect their pinned colleage.

By the time Public Safety and Green Bay Fire and Rescue arrived, the victim had been freed and was breathing normally, although experiencing pain. He was transported and released later that day.

The certificates read:

“In appreciation and recognition of heroic actions and outstanding performance on August 18th, 2015”…   awarded this day… signed, Gary L. Miller, Chancellor.

Cupit earns Rosenberg Professorship

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Prof. Illene Cupit of the Human Development academic unit has been selected to hold the Rosenberg Professorship at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay for a five-year term through 2020. The honor was announced at the University’s annual convocation of faculty and staff on Aug. 26.

Chancellor Gary L. Miller presented Cupit with a ceremonial medallion. Cupit received a standing ovation from members of the University community in attendance at the event in the Phoenix Room of the University Union.

The award citation described Cupit as a prolific scholar, extraordinary instructor and nationally prominent leader in the study of death and bereavement.

“Her work with Camp Lloyd, the annual weeklong summer camp on the UWGB campus — the camp she founded to let children coping with loss know they are never alone,” the citation read, “has changed the lives of countless young people, and provided countless UW-Green Bay students rich and meaningful experience as mentors and para-professionals.”

Cupit is a specialist in cognitive development, infancy and early childhood, and death, dying and grieving. She organized the first Camp Lloyd in 2006 and named it for a family member who had to deal with the death of his father at a very young age. She envisioned the experience as a typical, fun summer camp, but one that provides a place for participating children to discover that there are other kids like them, and to learn that grieving is natural.

Cupit holds a Ph.D. from Temple University. She joined the UW-Green Bay faculty in 1984.

The Ben J. and Joyce Rosenberg Professorship was established in 1985. Ben and Joyce Rosenberg were long-time residents of Green Bay and supported UW-Green Bay from its inception. Their children, Gary Rosenberg and Barbara Rosenberg Shure, provided the funding for the memorial. The Rosenberg Professorship is open to tenured faculty members from all academic fields and recognizes a professor who has demonstrated a productive commitment to scholarship and whose work exemplifies the spirit and mission of UW-Green Bay.

In assuming the formal title of Ben J. and Joyce Rosenberg Professor, Cupit succeeds Prof. Regan A.R Gurung of Human Development and becomes the seventh UW-Green Bay faculty member to hold the appointment. Others were Lynn Walter, David Damkoehler, Craig Lockard, Harvey Kaye and Timothy Meyer.

Named professorships are created through private gifts that support the study and research of a faculty member who has an outstanding record of scholarly accomplishment. The annual stipend associated with this particular professorship is for five years, but the recipient retains the title for life. Stipends are typically applied to research expenses or special projects benefitting students or service to the community.

The Rosenberg Professorship is one of seven named professorships at UW-Green Bay.

Managing Projects and Supervisory Leadership featured in SBDC September workshops

The Wisconsin Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is offering two workshops in September as part of their Supervisory Leadership series.

“Managing Projects” is the Wednesday, September 23 workshop instructed by international project management expert Kay Wais. The workshop teaches best practices for temporary project teams as well as planning, budgeting, defining roles, handling change, and managing stakeholders and project risks such as meeting deadlines.

“Supervisory Leadership I” is the Tuesday through Wednesday, September 15-16, workshop instructed by supervisory leadership expert Eric Coryell. Attendees will bring their results from an online pre-workshop assessment in order to learn their leadership style for better decision making and trust-building skills in the workplace. “Supervisory Leadership I” is a required workshop in the Supervisory Leadership certificate program through the SBDC at UW-Green Bay.

For more information and to register for the SBDC’s supervisory leadership workshops and certificate program, go to the SBDC website and click on “Upcoming Programs.” You can also email or call (920) 496-2117.

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SBDC at UW-Green Bay reintroduces 7 Habits workshop for managers at reduced price

The Wisconsin Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay has reintroduced Franklin Covey’s “7 Habits for Highly Effective Managers” hundreds of dollars below other in-person and online courses of its kind. The two-day workshop is scheduled for Monday, October 12 through Tuesday, October 13.

Designed for new managers, emerging leaders, and experienced managers who need to make changes, the 7 Habits framework focuses is on who the manager is, not just on what they do. Managers will become leaders as they learn how to better equip their teams and improve how they achieve sustainable results through and with others.

The workshop will be taught by 7 Habits certified facilitator Kristin Odell, PHR, who has experience training managers in manufacturing companies, a Fortune 100 company, a family owned business, small businesses, and the public sector.

7 Habits for Highly Effective Managers is priced several hundred dollars below the national average for in-person and online workshops, at $995 per person. Franklin Covey materials as well as lunch and morning and afternoon refreshments are included. The workshop meets from 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. on Monday, October 12 and Tuesday, October 13 at the Advance Business & Manufacturing Center at 2701 Larsen Road in Green Bay. Visit the website, and go to Upcoming Programs and Talent Development to register and for a brochure. For additional information on the Wisconsin SBDC at UW-Green Bay, call (920) 496-2117, email, or tweet to @uwgbSBDC.

The Wisconsin Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at UW-Green Bay is part of a statewide network of SBDCs working with business owners and entrepreneurs to facilitate business growth and improvement, and to launch successful new companies. Through no-cost consulting, low-cost entrepreneurial education, and strategic facilitation, SBDC experts serve as resources for small and emerging mid-size companies. The Wisconsin SBDC is hosted by the University of Wisconsin-Extension and is funded in part through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration.

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Clif Ganyard is new Associate Provost

post-ganyardUW-Green Bay Prof. Clifton Ganyard has been named the University’s Associate Provost for Academic Affairs. He assumed his new duties Aug. 10.

Ganyard, associate professor of Humanistic Studies and most recently chair of the History program, was selected following an internal search. He succeeds former Associate Provost Gregory Davis, who was promoted to interim provost and vice chancellor in May.

In his new administrative role Ganyard reports to Davis and is responsible for helping coordinate activities that promote an enriching academic experience for students, and for providing leadership for programs that support student learning and instruction.

The Associate Provost plays a role in oversight of academic program review implementation, curriculum development and data analytics; assessment and testing services; institutional accreditation; institutional research; inter-institutional academic agreements; international education programs; and commencement.

Ganyard was the 2014 recipient of a prestigious UW System Board of Regents Teaching Excellence Award. He joined the UW-Green Bay faculty in 1997 and has taught more than two dozen different courses for Humanistic Studies, History and Global Studies. His areas of specialization include modern European, German and Japanese history and culture, Western civilization and European intellectual history.

Ganyard has numerous publications to his credit, including “Artur Mahraun and the Young German Order: An Alternative to National Socialism in Weimar Political Culture” (2008), as well as a number of scholarly reviews. Ganyard’s many awards in addition to the Regents award include UW-Green Bay Research Scholar, Grants in Aid of Research, Teaching Enhancement and Teaching Fellow honors, as well as UW System and Beloit Center for Language Studies grants, among others. In 2010, Ganyard earned the UW-Green Bay Founders Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Ganyard earned his bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees from the State University of New York at Buffalo.