Author Archives: Robert Hornacek

UW-Green Bay and Bellin College offer Life’s a Lab Reality Science Camp 


Students entering grades 10 through 12  in fall can enroll now for the Life’s a Lab Reality Science Camp, July 31-Aug. 3, at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Drive.


The camp is a partnership between UW-Green Bay’s Summer Camp program in the Office of Outreach and Extension and Bellin College. For students interested in health careers such as physical therapy, sports medicine, radiology, emergency medical and research, this camp will offer lab experiences in the mornings and tours of professional clinics and other medical facilities in the afternoons.


Camp instructors include UW-Green Bay Human Biology Profs. Amanda Nelson and Dan Meinhardt, and instructors from the Bellin College team in the afternoons. See the camp website for faculty/staff updates: www.uwgbsummercamps.com.


Students can attend as commuters or as residents living in UW-Green Bay student housing.


The camp fee is $249 for commuters. Resident students will pay $429, which includes instruction, room and board, counselor supervision, and transportation to evening activities.


Camp information and registration are available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Information also is available by telephone at (920) 465-2775 or (800) 621-2313.

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UW-Green Bay offers High School Summer Art Studio


The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is once again offering the Summer Art Studio camp for high school students, celebrating its 54th year in northeast Wisconsin.


Summer Art Studio, for students entering grades 8 through 12, will be held June 26-July 1 at UW-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Drive. Registration is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com.

Camp attendees will be taught by some of the best teachers and professional artists from across the state. A variety of classes will be offered, including:

Photography in Black and White with Jenna Bigott

Human Portrait Painting with Frank Juarez

Fashion Design  with Cory Linsmeyer and Mindy Sue Wittock

Mosaic Workshop with Margy Cottingham

Junk to Jewelry and Funky Wearables  with Erica Becker

Multi-Media Figure Drawing with Sara Tlachac

Mixed Media Digital Photo with Tammy Resulta

Computer Animation with Tom Wallestad

Acrylic Painting: From Ordinary to Extraordinary with Arda Ishkhanian

Ceramics: Using the Potter’s Wheel and Advanced Hand-Building Techniques in Raku Firing with Dean Hoegger


Co-directors for the camp are Carrie Fonder and Sandra Shackelford. A listing of course descriptions and more about the instructional staff can be found online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com.


Daily classes are 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday to allow students to prepare for the free, public final exhibition in UW-Green Bay’s Lawton Gallery.


Students may attend the camp as commuters or they may live in student housing on the UW-Green Bay campus. Camp fees are $249 for commuters and $549 for residents. In addition to instruction, the residential fee includes room and board, counselor supervision on activities and overnight, and transportation to evening activities.


Camp information and registration are available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Information also is available by phone at (920) 465-2775 or (800) 621-2313.

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UW-Green Bay Middle School Summer Art Studio registration gets under way

Enrollment is open now for the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Middle School Summer Art Studio scheduled Monday through Friday, June 20-24, on the UW-Green Bay campus at 2420 Nicolet Drive. Students eligible to attend are those who will enter grades six through nine.


Students can choose from a variety of art mediums and will choose two of the following sessions as their camp focus. Early enrollment is encouraged to ensure desired course selection.


Ceramics: Introduction to Wheel Throwing for Raku Firing will teach students the basics of hand-building techniques for making functional and sculptural forms and students will be introduced to throwing pots on a wheel. Professional potter and teacher Dean Hoegger will instruct the class.


Introduction to Fine Art Digital Photography will introduce students to the workings of their own digital camera and Photoshop. Students will work with Tammy Resulta to take photographs in the environment and in the studio and will learn the editing process and composition.


Wildlife Illustration instructor Sara Tlachac will help students capture creatures of the wild with pencil, pastels and charcoal. Students will develop drawing skills through gesture drawing, shading and the use of grid method.


Cartooning and Comic Book Illustration will feature instructor Tom Wallestad, who has a passion for cartooning. Students will learn basic cartooning drawing skills, the foundation of penciling, inking, coloring and transferring images.


Introduction to Acrylic Painting offers students a variety of acrylic painting techniques, including working with brush and/or spatula, glazing, impasto and collage. Professional artist Arda Ishkhanian will help students transfer their emotions, moods, tensions and tranquility to the canvas. Simple exercises will help spark the imagination and deepen the understanding of texture, shape, form and interesting imagery.


Fashion Design with Cory Linsmeyer will explore the fast-paced world of fashion designers, models and stylists. Students will be meeting deadlines, coming up with new fashion ideas and producing outfits that are original.

Fashion Illustration and Accessory Designs with Cory Linsmeyer introduces young artists to the world of fashion and garment construction. The course will focus on the drawing and illustration aspects of fashion. Students will be given challenges to design clothes based on various inspirations from history and pop culture.


From Junk to Jewelry with jewelry instructor Erica Becker will show students how to transform cast-off objects into wearable art. Students will be introduced to the basics of jewelry-making.

Middle School Summer Art Studio is a day camp only, with classes scheduled from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Friday classes end at 3 p.m. to allow students to prepare their work for the free, public final exhibition in UW-Green Bay’s Lawton Gallery.

Students and their parents are responsible for providing their own daily transportation to Summer Studio. Commuters may bring their lunches, purchase meal cards, or purchase snacks from vending machines. The camp fee of $249 covers instruction. Some classes requiring special materials also have a lab fee.

More information and registration is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. The telephone numbers for information are (920) 465-2775 or (800) 621-2313.

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Phuture Phoenix scholarship application deadline April 15

Area high school seniors have until April 15 to apply for a $1,000 University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Phuture Phoenix scholarship.

Scholarships are made available to qualified students who plan to attend UW-Green Bay in the fall of 2011. The $1,000 scholarships are renewable each year the student attends UW-Green Bay.

“College access is more critical today than ever, because our world and our workplaces are changing so rapidly, so dynamically,” said Phuture Phoenix Director Kim Desotell. “Through the Phuture Phoenix program we are saying that we will help students reach for their dreams.”

Scholarship awards will be based upon the applicants’ prior involvement in the Phuture Phoenix program through mentoring, tutoring, or participation in the annual October Tour Day as a fifth-grader. The scholarship will also be based on financial need and proof of admission to UW-Green Bay.

The awards are made possible through the generosity of local donors supporting the Phuture Phoenix program. Applications are available in high school guidance offices, at the UW-Green Bay Institute for Learning Partnership (Cofrin Library 750), and at www.uwgb.edu/phuturephoenix/.

The award-winning Phuture Phoenix program is a university/community enterprise that began in 2003 from an extended conversation between Cyndie Shepard, the wife of former chancellor Bruce Shepard, and University Trustee Ginny Riopelle about establishing a mentoring program that could help students in at-risk schools stay on course for college.

It has since served more than 10,000 school children from elementary schools with significant low-income populations. Later this month Silver Lake College will join UW-Eau Claire and Western Washington University in replicating the Phuture Phoenix program.

The cornerstone event of Phuture Phoenix is an autumn tour of the campus for nearly 1,300 fifth-graders attending high-needs schools in the area. Giving them tours are hundreds of UW-Green Bay student volunteers.

Since its inception Phuture Phoenix program has grown well beyond a field trip. Each year UW-Green Bay students go to middle and high schools to serve as positive role models and mentors for nearly 1,000 at-risk students.

“This will be our second year of awarding scholarships to Phuture Phoenix participants.  Many of the applicants and scholarship recipients will be the first members of their families to attend college. It is a real pleasure to see these students receive assistance in their goal of obtaining a college education,” said Janet Lieb, community volunteer and chairperson of the scholarship committee.

The Phuture Phoenix program at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay aims to increase the odds that at-risk students will graduate from high school and also pursue higher education. Phuture Phoenix involves bringing area fifth-graders from Title I elementary schools from throughout Northeastern Wisconsin to spend a day on campus as a means to envision themselves as future college students. Phuture Phoenix mentors—UW-Green Bay student volunteers—continue contact with many of these students in Phase II of the program. The mentors work closely with students in grades 6-12, tutoring and mentoring them. Since its inception in 2003, Phuture Phoenix has connected with more than 10,000 students, encouraging them to do well in school and dream of a future they may not have considered by moving on to higher education. The program was designed because Northeast Wisconsin has a lower percentage of students in the state graduating high school and going on to higher education.

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Students, researchers to gather at watershed symposium

Watershed SymposiumArea high school students, teachers and university researchers will gather at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay on Tuesday, March 15 for the eighth annual watershed symposium hosted by the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program and the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity.

The program provides hands-on science education for young people and has yielded important data on tributaries that feed the Fox River and influence water quality on the bay of Green Bay.

The symposium provides a forum for high school students from eight area schools to share their findings, interact with teachers and professional scientists, and learn about research and watershed management in the Fox River Basin.

The annual symposium begins at 8:15 a.m. and continues throughout the day in Mary Ann Cofrin Hall on the UW-Green Bay campus.

Pat Robinson, freshwater estuary specialist with the UW-Extension, will provide the keynote address on “Great Lakes freshwater estuaries: What are they and why should we care?”

Other presentations include:

• Jim Jolly, Brown County Land Conservation Department, “The Green Bay West Shore Northern Pike Habitat Restoration Project”

• Prof. Dan Meinhardt, UW-Green Bay Natural and Applied Sciences, “Skeletal Abnormalities in Frogs”

• Brenda Nordin, Water Resources Management Specialist, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, “Aquatic Invasive Species”

• Matt Maccoux, UW-Green Bay graduate student, “Phosphorus in Green Bay and the Great Lakes”

Monitoring program adviser Kevin Fermanich, associate professor of Natural and Applied Sciences, says, “We’re excited to be able to host this student watershed symposium for the eighth year. I’m particularly pleased that many new students and several new teachers will be attending the symposium. One of the those new teachers is Carolina Bacelis, a UW-Green Bay alumna, who will be bringing students from the Boys and Girls Club of Green Bay.”

Vicki Medland, the associate director of the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity at UW-Green Bay, says the symposium is the culmination of the students’ research experience.

“It brings together students from the different schools involved in the project to share experiences and compare the scientific data they have collected,” Medland said. “Communication of scientific information to a larger audience is often difficult and is an important learning objective. The students are given the opportunity to teach others about the water quality in their own communities. Many of the speakers are graduate students or professionals working in water quality and they provide further inspiration for students to continue to pursue their interests in water-related science.”

The symposium and Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program are supported in part by a gift from Arjo Wiggins Appleton Ltd. The symposium is also sponsored by the UW-Green Bay program in Natural and Applied Sciences and the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity.

For more information about the symposium contact Annette Pelegrin at (920) 465-5031, or pelegria@uwgb.edu or visit www.uwgb.edu/watershed.

UW-Green Bay offers nursing courses in ‘Northwoods’

A bachelor’s degree in nursing may not be as far away as some people think.

The Professional Program in Nursing at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay offers students in Marinette and Rhinelander the opportunity to earn a bachelor’s degree in the comfort of their own home and their own community.

The RN to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Completion Program includes a combination of in-person and online courses. Typically, one core nursing course is offered face-to-face each semester in Marinette and Rhinelander. The courses meet at UW-Marinette and Nicolet College. The rest of the courses may be taken as a mix of face-to-face and online formats.

Susan Gallagher-Lepak, interim chair of the Professional Program in Nursing at UW-Green Bay, says faculty members are proud to be able to prepare nurses in Marinette and Rhinelander areas for the complexities of healthcare in the 21st century.

“Higher levels of nursing education are linked to lower patient mortality, fewer errors, and greater job satisfaction,” Gallagher-Lepak said. “Increasing the number of BSN-prepared nurses will positively impact the quality of healthcare in our future.”

Derryl Block, the interim dean of Professional and Graduate Studies at UW-Green Bay, says the more flexible options allow students to earn a degree without compromising other priorities.

“The extension of our nursing program to these locations extends access for registered nurses to our quality program, and helps contribute to the quality of nursing care in these areas,” Block said.

Students in the program say it has enhanced their skills.

“It has made me think more critically in my practice and expanded my knowledge,” said Vallery Krah, a student from Marinette. “I feel I am a more rounded nurse.”

Students also say the flexibility of the program makes it cost-effective and convenient.

“There’s no travel and I can still take classes in a classroom setting,” said student Carrie Rupert.

Melissa Chmela said the program offers the “ability to balance family, career and education” while still being close to home.

The program, which is nationally accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, is geared toward working adults. Full-time and part-time options are available. Coursework is typically completed in two to four years.

For more information or to register, call (920) 465-2826 or toll free (888) 674-8942 or e-mail nursing@uwgb.edu or visit www.uwgb.edu/nursing.

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UW-Green Bay offers summer courses for educators

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is once again offering dozens of summer courses for educators who are looking for opportunities to reach professional development goals, obtain license renewal, or seek salary advancement.

The courses, offered by UW-Green Bay’s Education Outreach Program, include face-to-face as well as online learning formats and include credit and noncredit enrollment options.

New courses this summer include:

Walk It, Talk It, Chalk It – This course is geared toward K-12 educators who will learn the basics of educational improvisation and its application to classroom management, student engagement, and enhancement of student creativity.

Teaching United States Labor History – Online course where educators will investigate the history of the labor movement in the United States from 1877 to present. The history of organized labor and the collective bargaining process will be emphasized.

Teaching Mathematics to our Youngest Learners – Develop age-appropriate, hands-on activities aimed at developing strong critical thinking and problem-solving skills for our youngest learners in the area of mathematics.

Foundations for Early Literacy Success – Join fellow early childhood educators for an in-depth exploration of the five major elements of early literacy: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension.

Children and Poverty – Examine the issue of childhood poverty and homelessness and the effects on the brain and learning. Explore strategies for teaching students to be in charge of their education and develop a plan for ad- dressing issues of poverty in your educational setting.

Bullying Gone Viral – Take an in-depth look at bullying in the digital age, including cyber-bulling, cyber-harassing, cyber-stalking, and sexting. Join us and engage in an understanding of the impact that new age bullying can have on students today.

Enrollment in all classes is limited, so registration at least three weeks before the start of a course is recommended. For more information call (920) 465-2480 or (800) 621-2313 or e-mail educationoutreach@uwgb.edu.

For a full listing of classes, costs and scheduled dates and times or to register online visit: www.uwgb.edu/educationoutreach.

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UW-Green Bay nursing program to host education conference

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Professional Program in Nursing is hosting the fifth annual Wisconsin Technology Enhanced Collaboration Nursing Education Conference on April 7-8. This year’s conference will highlight “E-Learning in Nursing: Design, Innovation, Delivery and Evaluation.”

The two-day conference will be held from noon to 8 p.m. on Thursday, April 7 at Lambeau Field and from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Friday, April 8 at the University Union on the UW-Green Bay campus.

The objective of this year’s conference is for nursing faculty in attendance to be able to use and implement the eight dimensions of flexible framework for e-learning by Badrul Khan in their online teaching. Scholars will be challenged to enhance their knowledge and understanding of e-learning as well as evaluate their design and delivery methods in online courses and programs.

Presenters include:

Diane J. Skiba, Emerging Technologies in Nursing Practice and E-learning; Professor of Health Care Informatics, University of Colorado in Denver and the author of Emerging Technologies.

Badrul H. Khan, International and Cultural Perspectives in E-learning; President and founder of McWeadon Education, a nationally respected educator, author, speaker and consultant in the field of e-learning and distance learning.

Patricia Flatley Brennan, Professor of Engineering and Nursing, UW-Madison; Reflections and Sustainability of Technology; Enhanced Nursing Education; Principal Investigator for the HRSA grant: Wisconsin Technology Enhanced Collaborative Nursing Education (WI TECNE) and leads the project to improve the integration of informatics and technology into nursing curricula.

The conference will host several different sessions on topics that relate closely to the use of technology in the field of nursing.

Technology in E-learning and Health in Nursing and the NFL; Janet Reilly, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

The Use of a Wiki in a Nursing Leadership Course in the BSN@HOME Program; Gail Hanson Brenner, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

Advantages and Pitfalls of High Tech Usage in an RN to BSN Program; Therese Blakeslee, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh

Using Virtual World to Promote Concepts of Ethics and Social Justice in an RN to BSN Program; Christine Vandenhouten, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

The Application of Problem Based Learning in a Senior-Level Undergraduate Course; Kay Jansen, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

The Case Scenario Builder in a Human Sexuality Course: A Pilot; Rebecca Muehrer, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Interface Design Analysis of Online Nursing Courses; Brenda Tyczkowski, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay; Eric Bauman, University of Wisconsin-Madison; David Simpkins, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Evaluation in E-learning: Results of Year Five; Christine Vandenhouten, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

Break out sessions include:

Instructional Online Gaming; Eric Bauman, University of Wisconsin-Madison

E-learning and the Americans with Disabilities Act; Lynn Niemi, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

Technology and Academic Integrity; Tim Bristol, NurseTim, Minneapolis, MN

E-learning and Faculty Load/ E-learning Lessons Learned in Nursing; J. Goodlett McDaniel and Carol Quam Urban, George Mason University, Washington D.C.; Florence Richman, Northern Virginia Community College

The Latest in E-learning: The Horizon Report 2011; Alan Wolf, University of Wisconsin-Madison

First Nation Students in E-learning; Rosemary Christensen, retired from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

Legal Aspects of Intellectual Property in E-learning; Claire Covington Reilly, Esq., Reed Smith LLP, Chicago, Ill.

Student Perspectives of E-learning; Penny Ralston-Berg, Penn State University

African American Students in E-learning; Cheryl Killion, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.

Full conference details are available at: www.uwgb.edu/outreach/nursing. Faculty members from other disciplines who teach online are encouraged to attend. For more information contact Janet Reilly at reillyj@uwgb.edu or (920) 465-2365.

#11-32

Conservationist to speak at UW-Green Bay

Conservationist Liz Titus Putnam, the founder of the Student Conservation Association, will speak at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 29, in Phoenix Room B of the University Union on the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive.

Putnam, who was awarded a 2010 Presidential Citizens Medal, founded the Student Conservation Association, the country’s first and now largest youth volunteer and environmental conservation organization.

The Student Conservation Association gives college students and high school students hands-on service opportunities in all types of fields including invasive species eradication, wildfire management and education, environmental education, and trail restoration and maintenance.

Putnam’s talk, titled “Environmental Conservation and Youth Civic Engagement,” focuses on the significance of building the next generation of conservation leaders. She will also guest lecture in two classes during her visit.

The presentation is free and open to the public. For more information contact the Office of Student Life at (920) 465-2720 or visit www.uwgb.edu/stulife.

#11-31

UW-Green Bay to host Fox River watershed symposium

Area high school students, teachers and university researchers will gather at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay on Tuesday, March 15 for the eighth annual watershed symposium hosted by the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program and the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity.

The program provides hands-on science education for young people and has yielded important data on tributaries that feed the Fox River and influence water quality on the bay of Green Bay.

The symposium provides a forum for high school students from eight area schools to share their findings, interact with teachers and professional scientists, and learn about research and watershed management in the Fox River Basin.

The annual symposium begins at 8:15 a.m. and continues throughout the day in Mary Ann Cofrin Hall on the UW-Green Bay campus.

Pat Robinson, freshwater estuary specialist with the UW-Extension, will provide the keynote address on “Great Lakes freshwater estuaries: What are they and why should we care?”

Other presentations include:

• Jim Jolly, Brown County Land Conservation Department, “The Green Bay West Shore Northern Pike Habitat Restoration Project”

• Prof. Dan Meinhardt, UW-Green Bay Natural and Applied Sciences, “Skeletal Abnormalities in Frogs”

• Brenda Nordin, Water Resources Management Specialist, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, “Aquatic Invasive Species”

• Matt Maccoux, UW-Green Bay graduate student, “Phosphorus in Green Bay and the Great Lakes”

Monitoring program adviser Kevin Fermanich, associate professor of Natural and Applied Sciences, says, “We’re excited to be able to host this student watershed symposium for the eighth year. I’m particularly pleased that many new students and several new teachers will be attending the symposium. One of the those new teachers is Carolina Bacelis, a UW-Green Bay alumna, who will be bringing students from the Boys and Girls Club of Green Bay.”

Vicki Medland, the associate director of the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity at UW-Green Bay, says the symposium is the culmination of the students’ research experience.

“It brings together students from the different schools involved in the project to share experiences and compare the scientific data they have collected,” Medland said. “Communication of scientific information to a larger audience is often difficult and is an important learning objective. The students are given the opportunity to teach others about the water quality in their own communities. Many of the speakers are graduate students or professionals working in water quality and they provide further inspiration for students to continue to pursue their interests in water-related science.”

The symposium and Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program are supported in part by a gift from Arjo Wiggins Appleton Ltd. The symposium is also sponsored by the UW-Green Bay program in Natural and Applied Sciences and the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity.

For more information about the symposium contact Annette Pelegrin at (920) 465-5031, or pelegria@uwgb.edu or visit www.uwgb.edu/watershed.

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